PS4 vs Xbox One: which gaming console is better?

Xbox One vs PS4

Xbox One vs PS4

Xbox One vs PS4: is PS4 or Xbox more powerful?

  • The Xbox One X is the most powerful machine, beating out the PS4 Pro

PS4 and Xbox One multiply the power of Xbox 360 and PS3. More importantly, they're built with smarter internal designs, learning from some of the mistakes of last-generation consoles.

Chip manufacturer AMD is behind most of these upgrades. Both the original Xbox One and the Xbox One S have a custom, 1.75GHz AMD 8-core CPU, while the Xbox One X bumps that up to a 2.3GHz 8-core chip.

The base PS4 CPU remained clocked at 1.6GHz and contains a similar custom AMD 8-core CPU with x86 based architecture, while the PS4 Pro bumps that clock speed up to 2.13GHz.

Xbox One vs PS4

Xbox One vs PS4

The original PS4 boasts a 1.84 teraflop GPU that's based on AMD's Radeon technology. Meanwhile the original Xbox One graphics chip, also with an AMD Radeon GPU, had a pipeline for 1.31 teraflops, although this increased to 1.4 teraflops with the Xbox One S and to a whopping 6.0 teraflops on the Xbox One X.

The PS4 Pro, meanwhile, has a GPU with a considerably increased 4.2 teraflops of graphical horsepower. 

When it came to the original consoles, the PS4 won out in terms of raw power, although the Xbox One S closed the gap considerably. 

Microsoft, with the release of the Xbox One X took the title of "most powerful console" from Sony. 

PS4 vs Xbox One: RAM

  • Both systems have 8GB of RAM overall.
  • But they allocate that memory to developers differently.

Even more controversial is the memory under the consoles' matte black hoods. It's not the amount of RAM at issue – both are future-proofed with 8GB of RAM – it's the type of RAM used.

Both the PS4 and PS4 Pro have a distinct advantage with faster 8GB GDDR5 memory, while both the original Xbox One and the Xbox One S went with the slower bandwidth of the 8GB DDR3 variety. But, wait, there's more to it.

Neither system allocates all of that RAM to game developers – some is reserved to run their respective operating systems.

PS4 reserves up to 3.5GB for its operating system, leaving developers with 4.5GB, according to the documentation. They can sometimes access an extra 1GB of "flexible" memory when it's available, but that's not guaranteed.

Xbox One vs PS4

Xbox One vs PS4

Xbox One's "guaranteed memory" amounts to a slightly higher 5GB for developers, as Microsoft's multi-layered operating system takes up a steady 3GB. It ekes out a 0.5GB win with more developer-accessible memory than the PS4 consoles, unless you factor in Sony's 1GB of "flexible" memory at certain times – then it's 0.5GB less.

Then, you get to the Xbox One X, which blows away the other consoles by offering a drastically higher 12GB of RAM, meaning that game developers have access to a whopping 9GB of RAM for games (which is necessary when playing in native 4K).

The consoles currently on the market now have similar AMD architecture at their core, but contrast like apples and oranges when it comes to memory. Only developers can determine how this battle is won.