Tinder's new feature brings friends closer...too close, some say

Tinder Social wants to cure FOMO, but could be TMI

A new feature on the popular meetup/hookup/hangout app Tinder wants to bring your friends closer, but may have inadvertently brought friends a little too close.

Unveiled yesterday to the public, Tinder Social means to spice up going out with your homies by matching your group of friends with another group, à la how singles have been matched up since the app's inception.

Upon each squad being set up, Social acts like a group chat where all y'alls can agree on a plan and form a super-squad that can also double as a group date. While meeting randos in a group setting is less awkward - not to mention safer - solo Tinder users might actually have more privacy.

The issue with buddying up on Tinder Social is that forming your group taps into a user's Facebook friends list. Tinder already uses your Facebook profile when you make an account, but never posts on your behalf to keep your swipe-life private.

How close is close enough?

Herein lies the rub: Setting up your Tinder Social team means inviting friends with Tinder accounts, leading to reports of users learning which of their friends, family, and coworkers have a Tinder.

Engadget uncovered some awkward instances of users learning that friends in long-term relationships may be up to some swiping on the side, or groups being immediately propositioned for group sex.

While Tinder Social could be promising for polyamorous relationships or merging social circles, concerns about the app oversharing your Facebook friends' social life are legitimate.

Tinder commented that users can opt-out of Tinder Social so that they don't show up on their friends' lists, but don't seem to think it's as big an issue as some are making it out to be.

"We are only testing it at this point," said Tinder on its official blog, "but it's important to note Tinder's not a secret, considering 70% of users download Tinder because their friends recommend it."

Oh, privacy on a top-ranked app linked to the world's biggest social network isn't an issue because your friends said it was cool? Talk about a mediocre stance.