Samsung had told TechRadar it's looking to push its Music Hub across multiple platforms in its quest to become a big player in the mobile music arena.

Tae Geun Kim, group leader in Samsung's contents planning team, also outlined some of the reasons why the service is only launching on the Samsung Galaxy S3 to begin with:

"Our service will be open to all developers and other operating systems – once we've launched we can then join into other operating that Samsung works with."

Populating the Galaxy

"This means Android, Tizen, Windows Phone and Bada – although we're working with Android first.

"Our strategy is open to all Android devices – it will be the Samsung Galaxy family first, but phase two will be much more open.

"With the likes of the Galaxy S2 and the Galaxy Note, we have to solve issues around the resolution and density of the screens, but they're not huge problems."

Share, care, work, play

Daren Tsui, CEO of mSpot also floated the idea of the service launching on iOS as a possibility, but stopped short of stating we would see Music Hub on the App Store:

"In my house we've got both Galaxy and iPhone devices – we'll see on perhaps having an iOS version [of Music Hub], but users can always access the service through a web browser.

"It's designed to be an open service, and we want to support it."