Latest statistics put wireless adoption in laptops at 95 per cent. So even if you don't intend on using the technology, you're likely to find it in your laptop. Setting up a network at home has never been easier, but if you're new to wireless and networks in general, this suite of tools may help you get to grips with it.

The software is designed to help you set up a connection between the mobile devices in your home and with your base router - this can either be a Wi-Fi modem or a standard access point - and once connected to configure and manage the security aspects.

Sadly, the practise was a little different from the theory. The software takes control of your router and any adapters on the network, allowing you to configure them from the same window. If the software worked as intended this would save time and a degree of dealing with settings.

However, we found it less ideal than Windows own Wi-Fi manager, as the signal was weaker and on occasions after it had dropped out completely, we switched back to Windows settings and immediately regained a connection.

Once you have a connection, and maintain it, you can then add security. Routers ship with security switched off to make setting up easier, so it's vital to set it up correctly and change the password to something you'll remember.

Once again, we found this didn't live up to expectations, making it difficult for the first-time user to get up and running. You'll find a PC blocker installed, which prevents machines outside your network from piggy-backing on to your network.

Perhaps the biggest problem we had with Wireless Security Suite was in finding who would best benefit from its use. With manufacturers now making networks easier to connect to - Buffalo's AirStation One-Touch Secure System (AOSS) is one example - software such as this has a short lifespan.