Last year Getty shot the Royal Wedding in 3D and so it's decided to do the same for the Olympics.

Shooting sporting action in 3D will, it claims, bring a fresh perspective to some of the less photogenic sports where the extra dimension that depth can bring will add a whole new level of realism.

Getty hasn't explained how its 3D images will be viewed other than on a 3D television, but in some ways it doesn't matter. Recording the games in 3D will enable future generations to get closer to the action and hopefully, by that time, 3D viewing technology will be far more advanced.

360 View

Alongside the 3D gadgetry, Getty will be recording images using 360-degree cameras which will enable viewers to pan their the way around a scene in any direction to get a real sense of place.

High-resolution technology will also enable viewers to zoom right in on the action and time-lapse sequences will tell a bigger story.

Of course there's no substitute for a professional sports photographer catching the action but the Olympics will require hundreds of photographers to cover all the events. For certain long shots and for photos taken from inaccessible areas, such as lighting towers or the tops of tall buildings, Getty has the answer. It will be installing a network of robotic still cameras to catch a unique perspective on the games.

"Getty Images photographers will be at the very forefront, capturing the action with the latest technology and enabling us to supply our customers with the widest possible range of images to meet their needs. The fact that this includes 3D and 360 stills, alongside robotic capture is testament to our mission to offer innovative and ground breaking content," said Adrian Murrell, Senior Vice President, Global Editorial, Getty Images.

Sounds more fun than the games themselves…