Leica's TL fixes all the problems of its first luxury camera

It still costs a small fortune though

Leica has introduced the Leica TL, an updated version of the company’s first entirely touchscreen-operated compact camera, the Leica T.

The new camera comes with chamfered edges for a more comfortable in-hand feel than the cutting edges of the previous version. There’s also a new bronze-colored titanium anodized finish, in addition to the silver and black versions previously available.

Internally, the Leica TL sticks with the same 16MP APS-C CMOS sensor and contrast detection-based autofocus system, but there have been improvements elsewhere. For starters, it comes with double the internal storage at 32GB, and it boasts improved autofocus capabilities, particularly in continuous mode.

Lens compatibility has been expanded, allowing users to mount legacy Leica R-Lenses to the Leica TL with an accompanying R-Adapter L. The updated mount will also power the optical image stabilization systems built into Leica SL lenses, all of which are compatible thanks the Leica TL’s L-Bayonet mount.

Control-wise, nothing much has changed. Users will still largely control the camera entirely with the 3.7-inch touchscreen to make exposure adjustments.

Thankfully Leica has done a lot to improve the connectivity feature of its compact. Users will finally be able to transfer images and video directly to their smartphone rather than having to connect to an external wireless network. The new Android app and new features for the existing iOS app also enable users to wirelessly transfer images and control the camera complete with a live preview.

The new Leica TL camera worldwide from Leica stores, boutiques and dealers beginning in November. The camera body by itself will run for $1,695 (about £1,370, AU$2,190).

Meanwhile, the TL lenses start at $1,650 (about £1,330, AU$2,140) for the Leica VARIO-ELMAR-TL 18-56 mm f/3.5-5.6 ASPH and the Leica APO-Macro-Elmarit-TL 60 mm f/2.8 ASPH sits on the high end at $2,995 (about £2,410, AU$3,880).  

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kevin has been a writer for the better part of five years covering everything from green energy to high octane cars, videogames and tech, biohacking, and even city politics. At TechRadar he's settled into a life as the Computing Editor while also covering cameras and shooting video. He can be often found in the lab testing a half dozen laptops at a time or deciding which camera bags to carry for the day.