iOS 10.2 has so many new emojis you’ve desperately wanted on your iPhone

This is what they all look like

Apple's iOS 10.2 beta is shaping up to be the most expressive iPhone and iPad update yet, with new emojis that symbolize what we type out all of the time.

There are more than 72 new emojis in the developer beta, and it finally gives us an even shorter way of saying "I don't know," thanks to a shrug emoji.

The universal shrug symbol is joined by the more hopeful emoji titled "Hand With Index And Middle Fingers Crossed," according to Emojipedia.

Better known as "fingers crossed," this emoji gives you an illustrative way to say something like "Hoping that backordered Jet Black iPhone 7 or iPhone 7 Plus comes in soon. Fingers crossed!"

So when you find out your iPhone 7 delivery date is still mid-November, if you're a 10.2 beta user you can go ahead and make use of the all-new "Face Palm" emoji, available in male and female genders, to accurately capture your mood.

Other emojis making their debut in iOS 10.2 developer beta include new career roles: firefighter, welder, astronaut, judge, and both genders and all races are here.

There's now a male dancing equivalent to the red-dress-wearing female dancer first seen in 2010. He struts Saturday Night Fever-like disco moves in a blue suit. 

iOS 10.2 also sends in the clowns, cowboy-hat wearing smiley faces and gives sickness a two symbol icons: nauseated and a tissue-wielding sneezing face.

There are a quartet from the animal kingdom: Fox, Duck, Squid and Gorilla. Who will be the first person to message you "What did the (Fox emoji) say?" They really need an "unfriend" emoji as only a no-word response to this appropriate for that joke.

We'll have more iOS 10 update news as we further explore iOS 10.1, and also let you know what's new with the watchOS 3.1.1 and macOS 10.12.2 updates.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Matt Swider is TechRadar's gadget-savvy, globe-trotting mobile editor in Los Angeles. As an expert in iOS and Android, he owns over 120 phones that someone keeps setting the alarms on – simultaneously. He received his journalism degree from Penn State University and is never seen without his TechRadar headphones.