Today is the last day to register a .uk domain

Image credit: Shutterstock
(Image credit: Shutterstock)

Businesses and individuals with a third-level domain (.co.uk, .org.uk, .me.uk, .net.uk, .plc.uk or .ltd.uk) have until Tuesday morning to secure the shorter second level (.uk) equivalent of their domain before it becomes available to the public.

Five years ago, Nominet, the registry for the .uk domain launched a new shorter domain ending called .uk. Registrants of existing .co.uk domains were given five years to decide if they wanted the corresponding .uk domain.

On Tuesday, June 25, the five year 'Right of Registration' period will come to an end with the deadline closing at 6:00 am BST. So if you haven't yet registered for a .uk domain, now is your last chance.

Of the original ten million rights, around 1.8m are still available for the rights holder to exercise. If you believe you may have the right to a .uk domain, you can easily check to see if you do by heading to this website and entering your domain.

Right of Registration

As the deadline approaches, many big brands such as Samsung, Audi and Toyota have signed up for their .uk domains.

However, once the deadline closes on Tuesday morning, all outstanding rights expire and the domains will become generally available in July.

Managing Director of Registry Solutions at Nominet, Eleanor Bradley explained that while it is the last day for businesses and invdividuals to claim their .uk domain, their existing .co.uk domains will not be affected, saying:

“With the deadline approaching, companies and individuals need to take action now to avoid missing out on securing the shorter domain. By taking up the equivalent .uk they guarantee they – and no-one else – can use it now and in the future. But it’s a choice. In a world with hundreds of different domain endings already available, from .uk and .com to .london and .vip, we know not everyone will feel it’s a priority.  For those happy with the .co.uk domain they already have, it is important to know that it will continue as normal.”