Super-sized monitor unveiled at Computex

Sapphire’s 56in monitor overshadows the rest of the show

For those who want the ultimate PC add-on to wow your friends, then look no further that Sapphire’s new monitor. The massive panel, unveiled at this year’s Computex, sizes in at an impressive 56in with a pixel count of 3840 x 2160. Not bad for a manufacturer who is best known for its graphic cards.

The as-yet-unnamed monitor is said to be made for a niche part of the PC market, namely designers and those in the medical profession. And for the minted, as it’s likely to retail round the $50,000 (£25,000) mark.

3D or not 3D?

If the sight of a 56in monitor wasn’t enough to get the Computex crowd salivating, then a preview of the company’s twin 3D monitors did. The pair on show were 22in 1650 x 1050 versions, which are said to give off a polarised stereoscopic image.

The monitors do require special glasses to see the 3D goodness and are powered by what the company is calling a ‘Sapphire innovation’.

Speaking about the 3D monitor setup, Bill Donnelly, Sapphire Technologies global public relations director, said: “ATI doesn’t have 3D drivers. We’ve done a proof of concept working with a different monitor manufacturer, using our own driver set to integrate with the ATI driver to deliver 3D not just in games but in the workstation market.”

These smart, compact panels are to be priced round the reasonable $700 (£350) bracket.

If you want 3D without the glasses, then you might want to check out Engadget where they have a bit of news on the biggest ever 3DTV that has some impressive specs – measuring 65in – but doesn’t actually require any specs. Nice.

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