XFX Radeon HD 5750 XXX review

Will a small overclocking boost make an attractive budget gaming card?

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Against the stock 5750, XFX's HD 5750 XXX is a clear improvement… by one frame per second in pretty much every game. For a £5 premium over the average 5750, it's hardly a stretch for the wallet, but difficult to justify.

However, if you want to play games at medium to high resolutions with anti-aliasing and anisotropic filtering cranked up to the nines, you're shopping on the wrong shelf. And don't make the mistake of assuming that because this is a DX11-ready card, you'll see the benefits in gaming. Tessellation, the headline gaming-visuals feature, is pretty demanding, and a single 5750 just won't cut it at any kind of tasty framerate.

Its performance makes it more suited to media centre systems, and the single-slot design means it's perfect for a dinky chassis. The only problem that leaves us with is the lack of an HDMI port, which is a dog-gone necessity for media-centre systems.

Which leaves us… where? Sort of halfway to something, but that conundrum is solved by the addition of a second identical card. In CrossFireX, you see major performance gains with these cards, and excellent DX11-supporting midrange performance at less than £200 shouldn't be sniffed at.

However, there's a clear winner in the sub-£100 3D card market at the moment, and it's Nvidia's GTS 450. It outperforms ATI's competing crop of 5750 cards in most gaming tests, and when you pop a couple in your system for SLI dual-card kicks, they outperform their sub £200 price-tag like a pair of glue-fuelled X-Factor hopefuls. Until these HD 5750s see a considerable price-drop, the GTS 450 is where you should wave your wallet.

We liked

Elegant, quiet, and happiest at lower resolutions, it's a decent budget gaming card for small systems. The single-slot design is a welcome reduction in real-estate from the stock twin-slotter 5850s, and that smaller cooler doesn't bother the GPU in the slightest.

We disliked

The lack of an HDMI port doesn't completely ruin it for media-centre systems, but it certainly doesn't help matters. We'd prefer to see an HDMI and a single DVI, rather than dual DVIs. In terms of gaming performance, there's little to write home about over the stock 5750.

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Tech Specs

Product TypeGraphic Card
Chipset ManufacturerATI
Chipset ModelHD 5750
Chipset LineRadeon
Chipset SeriesHD 5000
DisplayPortYes
Maximum Resolution2560 x 1600
Brand NameXFX
Standard Memory1 GB
Host InterfacePCI Express 2.1
Bus Width128 bit
Multi-GPU TechnologyCrossFireX
Green CompliantYes
Green Compliance Certificate/AuthorityRoHS
Digital SignalYes
Dual Link DVI SupportedYes
DVIYes
Number of DisplayPort Outputs1
Number of DVI Outputs2
Height4.4 mm
Memory TechnologyDDR5 SDRAM
Length7.9 mm
ManufacturerXFX Technologies, Inc
Memory Speed4800 MHz
Product ModelHD-575X-ZMD3
Product NameHD-575X-ZMD3 Radeon HD 5750 Graphics Card
Manufacturer Part NumberHD-575X-ZMD3
Manufacturer Website Addresshttp://www.xfxforce.com
Marketing Information

A single-slot card variant of the 5700 performance card family, it sports a uniquely designed fansink, with thermal capability of the HD 5750 dual slot channel fansink. This, combined with the open space provided by the single slot environment, ensures maximum airflow to the GPU.

Package Contents
  • HD-575X-ZMD3 Radeon HD 5750 Graphics Card
  • 6 Pin Y Power Cable
  • Installation CD
  • Quick Installation Guide
  • Driver CD Installation Guide
  • XFX Serial Number Door Hanger
Thickness0.8 mm
API SupportedDirectX 11.0, OpenGL 3.2, DirectCompute 11, OpenCL