The Goodmans LD2602 is one of the cheapest LCDs we've seen - a full £400 less than its Acer competitor. Looking at the TV's specifications, it's easy to see how Goodmans managed this price - there's almost nothing there.

Put this grey flatpanel next to any of its peers, and it looks as basic as its features list. Goodmans' thinking seems to be anyone who wants a low-price LCD won't care how it looks.

The par-down attitude continues with the socketry. The absence of a HDMI and a DVI mean this TV will never accept high-definition signals, despite its resolution. While this seems like AV Ludditism, it means the LD2602 will appeal to those who are just not interested in HDTV.

Which makes the lack of a digital tuner hard to fathom. While it would have increased the set's price, being able to watch Freeview without the need of an adapter would be a big attraction.

The lack of features continues across the board: except for the high 1280x768 resolution there's nothing special here. Except for the picture quality - a real surprise.

Motion is adeptly handled, with none of the juddering on horizontal pans seen on other budget models, while the picture is almost free from noise and artefacts.

Colours are bright and realistic, lacking green tints and the vividness other budget LCDs suffer from. This performance extends to dark scenes: shadows keep details, while staying dark.

The screen can grey over during movies, but for watching regular TV broadcasts this isn't a problem.

The biggest problem we found with TV is that it will not tolerate a weak source signal. Fed pictures from a Sky receiver or a DVD player linked by the RGB Scart, the picture was very good. Use the built-in tuner though, and they become soft, smear and suffer from noise.

The audio performance was better than anticipated. The speakers are light on the bass, but dialogue is clear and free of distortion.