Eclipse audio gear certainly isn't cheap. This particular setup of two speakers and a matching amplifier sets you back £680, and that's £140 cheaper than buying the components separately.

Brackets to ceiling-or wall-mount the speakers cost extra, as do the optional stands for positioning them on the floor instead of your desk; not exactly an impulse purchase, but you get a lot of engineering for your money.

The speakers are made from heavy polymers and look like little aircraft engines. While traditional, box shaped speakers' resonating panels colour and 'warm' the sound, the Eclipse TD508IIs are optimised for detail and purity. Their egg-like shape produces no echo or interference, so you only hear the accurate signal from the drive unit.

The result? An incredibly pure sound that's rich with detail; ideal for those who enjoy crystal-clear vocals and wonderfully realised 'natural' instruments like the piano or acoustic guitar, with the sound dancing between the speakers in a beautiful stereo effect. Yet it's not so good for fans of thumping bass.

The bottom end is as pure and clear as the rest of the sound, but if you'd rather listen to rap than Rachmaninoff, you might prefer something a little more intense.

The conical amplifier offers no equaliser or tone controls to beef up the bass, and although you can invest in a separate sub-woofer, at £650 it's almost as pricey as the speaker system.

One drawback to the Eclipse design ethos is that the units demand fussier placement than most speakers. Good positioning is essential for expansive sound reproduction, though they're more forgiving than previous offerings and if used on your desk as intended, setting up is an easy task.

Given that the system shares the same design and engineering as the £5,000 Eclipse TD712zMK2, it's not surprising the TD508II is of such a high quality.

Granted, it's not a system for everyone, but if you like your audio pure, detailed and beautifully realised – and are willing to pay the price – you could well fall in love with them before the first chorus.

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