Why BlackBerry wants to secure the IoT

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BlackBerry CEO John Chen has laid out the company’s pitch to be the security backbone of the ever-growing Internet of Things (IoT).

Speaking at the BlackBerry Security Summit in London today, Chen revealed a new platform which the company believes can be the key to ensuring a secure IoT.

BlackBerry Spark looks to secure what it calls the entire "Enterprise of Things", offering an end-to-end security service for the huge number of “hyperconnected” devices that are increasingly coming under attack.

“We're experiencing a big bang of technology, and we all have front row seats,” BlackBerry CTO Charles Eagen added.

(Image credit: Mike Moore)

BlackBerry Spark

 Spark includes a number of new security tools and systems designed specifically by BlackBerry for the IoT. This includes the likes of ransomware protection, contextual device management and a secure global directory among others.

The platform works across multiple operating systems, and BlackBerry has already signed up the likes of AWS, Microsoft, Google, Nvidia and Samsung under its protection, allowing their IoT devices to be protected against the latest threats.

But the platform can also allow organisations to build smarter IoT services and processes, such as utilising voice-activated AI assistants such as Amazon Alexa to build workplace calendars, or allowing communication between fleets of smart vehicles in order to send information on weather or road conditions.

Chen noted that BlackBerry is continuing to spread its reach into a myriad of different industries and verticals as it looks to position itself as one of the world’s leading security providers.

"Our mission is very simple - we try to secure every endpoint possible," Chen said.

Mike Moore
Deputy Editor, TechRadar Pro

Mike Moore is Deputy Editor at TechRadar Pro. He has worked as a B2B and B2C tech journalist for nearly a decade, including at one of the UK's leading national newspapers and fellow Future title ITProPortal, and when he's not keeping track of all the latest enterprise and workplace trends, can most likely be found watching, following or taking part in some kind of sport.