Xbox Game Pass family plan might be even more generous than we thought

Xbox Game Pass artwork
(Image credit: Microsoft)
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It looks like Xbox Game Pass members might soon be able to share their subscriptions with friends as well as family members.

Following the test launch of the new Xbox Game Pass family plan last month, reputed Twitter leaker Aggiornamenti Lumia (opens in new tab) has dug up a new marketing asset. The image features the Xbox logo above the words "family and friends", which could mean that you'll be able to share your games with people that aren't just your relatives.

That's handy for anyone who has lots of gaming buddies but no one in their family who wants to wile away their time on an Xbox Series X|S. As the test launch has already shown, splitting the subscription among your buddies will net you a big saving.

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As The Verge (opens in new tab) spotted, the current Xbox Game Pass family test launch doesn't explicitly state the new tier can't be shared among non-family members. Rather, it specifies Xbox Game Pass Ultimate subscriptions can only be passed around between players in the same country.

This leaked marketing image appears to confirm the leniency of the new tier. It hints that the new plan won't only be available for family members.  

Much like the features offered by Netflix and Amazon Prime, many Xbox Game Pass holders have been asking for a sharing function that would allow freeloading friends to join in the fun for years. But that's something Netflix clamped down on recently when it tried to tackle Netflix password sharing.

Prices of the new Xbox Game Pass Friends and Family tier haven't been announced yet. But the test launch is currently pitching the tier at around $24.99 / £18 / AU$26.50.

Jasmine is a freelance writer and podcaster based in the UK. Whether it's a Sims 4 lore deep-dive or a guide to securing kills in Dead By Daylight, her work is featured on TheGamer as well as the door of her mother's fridge. When she's not aggressively championing the Oxford comma on Twitter, you can find her scoping out the local music scene or buying gaudy Halloween decorations all year round.