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The most powerful laptop in the world has disappeared - here’s what happened

Origin NS-15
(Image credit: Origin)

For a few hours only, US-based Origin PC was offering the just-released Zen 3-based AMD Ryzen 9 5950X processor in a laptop not unlike the XMG Schenker Apex 15 mobile workstation that we reviewed in July.

That model has a 16-core AMD Ryzen 9 3950X at its heart and, despite a 105W TDP, managed to run relatively smoothly. So, it was expected that its follow-up, the 5950X, also sporting 16-cores and a 105W TDP, would be a painless upgrade.

Turns out that wasn't the case, because the processor needs a firmware update for the B450 motherboard shipped with the Origin's NS-15 mobile workstation. This, according to an industry insider contacted by TechRadar Pro, could take a couple of months - pushing us well into 2021.

Ryzen 5000

There’s also the possibility that a new motherboard will be released, before the firmware update, which natively supports Ryzen 5000 processors and could also add some new features.

When the dust finally settles, however, the 5950X will be by far the most powerful processor that can run inside a laptop.

Professional benchmarks run by workstation specialist Pugetsystems and Anandtech have shown that the 5950X will surpass its predecessor by an average of 20%, with the added bonus that an 8-core Ryzen 7 5800X is likely to be faster than a 3950X for most tasks.

That’s right, same TDP, same speed, half the cores, half the threads, $300 cheaper, and still faster. It’s almost a Christmas miracle.

Desire Athow

Managing Editor, TechRadar Pro

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Then followed a weekly tech column in a local business magazine in Mauritius, a late night tech radio programme called Clicplus and a freelancing gig at the now-defunct, Theinquirer, with the legendary Mike Magee as mentor. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global techfests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. He has an affinity for anything hardware and staunchly refuses to stop writing reviews of obscure products or cover niche B2B software-as-a-service providers.