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Zoom reveals shift to AWS cloud

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(Image credit: Zoom)
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Zoom (opens in new tab) may have broken a few hearts over at Oracle, after announcing that AWS is its cloud computing (opens in new tab) partner of choice. The confirmation comes just six months after Oracle boasted (opens in new tab) that it would be meeting Zoom’s core infrastructural needs.

In a strange twist, AWS has released a statement revealing that it remains Zoom’s preferred cloud provider. The two companies announced that they have a multi-year agreement in place, which should strengthen their relationship further.

“COVID-19 changed everything for Zoom, putting demands on the company to meet the video conferencing needs of hundreds of millions of new participants around the globe, and AWS was there from the beginning to ensure Zoom could scale to meet these new requirements virtually overnight,” said (opens in new tab) Andy Jassy, CEO of AWS.

“When organizations build on AWS – as Zoom has done since 2011 – they transform their business, expanding and innovating much faster. Together, Zoom and AWS have delivered great experiences for new Zoom users around the world, and we look forward to using the cloud to develop new ways to help the world communicate.”

Two timing

The press release also revealed that both AWS and Zoom will work together to deliver new solutions for Zoom's enterprise customers. Engineers at both companies have had to work tirelessly this year to ensure that Zoom’s infrastructure was able to handle a rapid increase in user numbers – growing from 10 million daily meeting participants in December 2019 to more than 300 million since April 2020.

In response, a Zoom spokesperson told TechRadar Pro that "Oracle continues to be Zoom cloud provider."

With Zoom and many other videoconferencing solutions witnessing a huge surge in popularity over the last few months, cloud capacity is in high demand, so it seems reasonable that Zoom will need to rely on both Oracle and Amazon to deliver the level of service that its customers expect.

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Via The Register (opens in new tab)

Barclay has been writing about technology for a decade, starting out as a freelancer with ITProPortal covering everything from London’s start-up scene to comparisons of the best cloud storage services.  After that, he spent some time as the managing editor of an online outlet focusing on cloud computing, furthering his interest in virtualization, Big Data, and the Internet of Things.