This AMD motherboard has a unique, exciting feature that will make power users jump out of their chairs — MSI's mATX wonder has two 25GbE Ethernet SPF28 ports, perfect for a cracking workstation rig

MSI D3052 motherboard
(Image credit: MSI)

MSI unveiled a number of new products at Computex 2024 in Taipei, Taiwan, including the D3052 single-socket Micro-ATX motherboard. 

The D3052 supports a single EPYC 4004 Series processor, up to TDP 170W. Part of AMD's 4th Generation EPYC family, the 4004 Series CPU is aimed at small businesses and entry-level servers. It offers up to 16 "Zen4"cores/32 threads so can handle demanding workstation and server workloads while also consuming less power during idle times.

Easily the highlight of the new new board, however, is the inclusion of dual 25GbE Ethernet SFP28 ports, something aimed at attracting power users looking for enhanced network speeds and efficiency.

SATA ports

The D3052 motherboard measures 9.6 x 9.6-inches (243.84mm x 243.84mm) and comes with four DDR5 UDIMM slots supporting up to 5200MT/s, as well as the aforementioned 25GbE SFP28 ports via an onboard Intel E810-XXV NIC, both of which support the Network Connectivity Status Indicator (NCSI).

The motherboard also provides two 2280/22110 PCIe 4.0 x4 NVMe M.2 ports, four SATA 3.0 ports (one of which supports SATA DOM) and two SATA 2.0 ports. Expansion ports include a PCIe 5.0x16 slot and a PCIe 5.0x8 one (x4 signal) from the CPU. Advanced server management is aided by the ASPEED AST2600 with IPMI and DMTF Redfish support, aimed at enterprise environments.

MSI also unveiled the D3051 Micro-ATX motherboard at the same time. This is very similar, but instead of dual 25GbE Ethernet SFP28 networking it boasts dual 1GbE and dual 10GbE ports.

There’s no word on pricing or availability for either the D3051or D3052 motherboards at the moment, but details should be made available shortly.

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Wayne Williams
Editor

Wayne Williams is a freelancer writing news for TechRadar Pro. He has been writing about computers, technology, and the web for 30 years. In that time he wrote for most of the UK’s PC magazines, and launched, edited and published a number of them too.