How to export LastPass passwords to Keeper

Safeguard your passwords, login credentials, and secrets with a new password manager

Keeper
(Image: © Keeper)

Since LastPass has suffered several security breaches during the last year, many security-conscious users have decided to ditch LastPass for a more secure password manager (opens in new tab). Since you’re probably one of them, you’ve surely stumbled upon Keeper while searching for a safer solution.

If yes, it’s hardly surprising, since Keeper has been around for more than a decade and still hasn’t been breached nor suffered any security incidents. It takes the safety of your logins and other sensitive information seriously with its solid security features including 256-bit AES encryption, advanced authentication methods, a data breach checker, a password strength testing tool, and “zero-trust/zero-knowledge” architecture. 

Yes, Keeper looks like a safe bet, but how to safely export your LastPass passwords to it? Well, it is simpler than you might think and you can do it without any special technical skills.  

Thanks to this step-by-step guide, you’ll find out how to migrate all your data (including passwords, folders, and secure notes) from LastPass to Keeper in just a couple of clicks. 

Now, let’s get things started by exporting your passwords and other data from LastPass.

Export your passwords from LastPass

Although you might be in the mood for deleting your old LastPass account, don’t do it until you’ve exported your LastPass passwords to your new password manager. If you delete your LastPass account before exporting a CSV file with all your vault data, you run the risk of being locked out of your account and your vault data being wiped out with it. 

Next, make sure that you’re using a secure personal computer. After all, you’ll be exporting/importing your sensitive data via CSV file, and not using a secure device could compromise your security and leave your data unprotected against cyber-criminals. 

Also, if you’re using any backup software, turn it off until the exporting/importing processes are complete. If you don’t, your unencrypted export file will get backed up.

Before we start we should mention that there are two ways in which you can export your passwords from LastPass: via the browser (opens in new tab) extension and LastPass web vault. However, the latter method is more straightforward, so we’re going to take advantage of it.

LastPass

(Image credit: LastPass)

1. Log in to your LastPass account

If you’re doing this via the preferred method - the LastPass web vault - go straight to the official website and log in to your LastPass account. For this, you’ll be asked to surrender your email address and your master password. Once it’s done, tap on the “Log in” button and you’re in. 

At the same time, if you want to do this via the LastPass browser extension go right to your browser and tap on the “Extensions” button - the one on the top right that looks like a puzzle piece. Then, once the dropdown menu appears, select LastPass from the list, and that’s it for now. 

Also, if you’ve enabled multi-factor authentication (MFA) on your account, you’ll have to verify your identity before going any further.

LastPass

(Image credit: LastPass)

2. Click on “Advanced Options” on the sidebar, then choose “Export”

When you find yourself on your LastPass dashboard, take a look to the left and find “Advanced Options” on the left sidebar - now, click on it. 

Once other options appear to the right, choose the “Export” button and hit it.

LastPass

(Image credit: LastPass)

3. Enter your master password and download a CSV file with your vault data to your computer

That’s it, you’ve successfully exported your passwords and other data from LastPass

After clicking on the “Export” button, you’ll be taken to another page where you’ll be prompted to enter your master password. Once you do, click on the “Continue” button.

The CSV file titled “lastpass_export.csv” with all your vault data will be automatically saved to your computer, so go and check where it is. Also, make sure the file has the correct CSV extension since it can’t be used without one.

Import your passwords to Keeper

Before importing your passwords via the CSV file, you’ll first want to make sure the latest version of Keeper is downloaded and installed on your computer.

Keeper

(Image credit: Keeper)

1. Log in to your Keeper account

To do this, you’ll be asked to supply your email address and your master password. Once you do, click on the “Login” button and wait for a second before you reach Keeper’s dashboard.  

Right off the bat, you’ll be asked to move all your existing passwords into Keeper, and this can be done via Keeper Importing Tool - you’ll have to download it though. However, while this method will capture most of your existing passwords and move them to Keeper in less than a minute, it’s not what we had in mind. 

It’s more convenient and less chaotic to do it stage by stage via a CSV file, so that’s how we’ll do it.

Keeper

(Image credit: Keeper)

2. Click on your email address and select “Settings”

Once you arrive at your dashboard, click on your email address in the top right corner and select “Settings” on the dropdown menu.

Keeper

(Image credit: Keeper)

3. Click on the “Import” button and select “LastPass” from the list

First, click on the “Import” button in the bottom left corner, just below the “Export” button. After this, a list of supported web browsers and password managers will appear, so go ahead and select “LastPass”.

Keeper

(Image credit: Keeper)

4. Drag and drop/browse your CSV file, click on the “Next” and then on the “Import” button

Before importing the CSV file you exported from LastPass moments ago, it’s smart to check if everything looks alright. 

Also, if you want to import your passwords and other vault data into the shared folder, you can checkmark that option in the bottom left corner. Then, click on the “Import” button and wrap everything up.

Keeper

(Image credit: Keeper)

As soon as the importing process is complete, you’ll receive the message above.

At last, let’s delete your LastPass account and any installed apps

LastPass

(Image credit: LastPass)

Then, click on yet another “Delete Account” button, enter your master password, confirm your choice, and wave goodbye to your old LastPass account. After this, locate all LastPass apps you’ve installed, and do the same with them.

To do this, go back to your LastPass dashboard, and select “Account Settings”. Once a new window pops up, choose “My Account” and then opt for the “Delete or Reset Account” option. 

Sead is a seasoned freelance journalist based in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. He writes about IT (cloud, IoT, 5G, VPN) and cybersecurity (ransomware, data breaches, laws and regulations). In his career, spanning more than a decade, he’s written for numerous media outlets, including Al Jazeera Balkans. He’s also held several modules on content writing for Represent Communications.