Best SD cards for Switch in 2022

Best SD cards for Switch in 2022
(Image credit: Future)

The best SD cards for Switch allow you to have a ton of great games available on Nintendo's latest home console hybrid. If you're someone who is planning an extensive collection or an existing user actively running out of room for new titles, one of these microSD cards is the answer. There will be no need to actively participate in inventory management then. 

That's what's so enticing about the best SD cards for Switch because the console itself doesn't exactly come full to bursting with gigabytes to spare. The standard Nintendo Switch console and Nintendo Switch Lite ship out of the box with just 32GB ready to go, but the Nintendo Switch OLED doubles that to 64GB. Fortunately, installing a Switch SD card only takes a few seconds; you simply have to pop the port open on the back, slide it in, and then the system should recognize it. 

Late November is a great time to consider investing in a Switch SD card, too. That's because the Cyber Monday Nintendo Switch deals are right around the corner. We've historically seen some of the largest discounts on memory cards ready for Nintendo's system over this period, too.

Best SD cards for Switch

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A SanDisk microSDXC being held in front of Nintendo Switch console

(Image credit: SanDisk)

1. SanDisk microSDXC for Nintendo Switch

The best SD cards for Switch

Specifications

Storage: 64GB, 128GB
Read Speed: up to 100 MB/s
SD Reader: No
Ultra High Speed: UHS-3

Reasons to buy

+
Officially licensed by Nintendo 
+
Competitively priced 
+
Available in different capacities 

Reasons to avoid

-
Non-branded options could be cheaper

SanDisk's officially licensed microSDXC for Nintendo Switch is our top pick for its wide market availability, competitive pricing, and different sizes available. If you're unsure of whether a microSD card will run inside your machine, you have a lot less to worry about here as this variant is endorsed by the company. 

Capacities range from 64GB all the way up to 512GB, which means you're doubling the total storage of the stock Nintendo Switch and matching that of the OLED model straight out of the gate. We personally believe that 128GB to be the sweet spot as this capacity is frequently available for around $25 and will give you likely all the overhead you will ever need to download expansive games from the eShop without worry. 

In terms of the rates that other capacities can run you, you can expect to pay around $50 for a 256GB variant and roughly double that for 512GB at MSRP. Deals are common, however, and it's entirely possible to score the largest capacities available for around the $60 mark at trusted retailers. 

Kingston SD cards near a Joy con

(Image credit: Kingston )

2. Kingston Canvas Go Plus microSDXC

The best premium SD cards for Switch

Specifications

Storage: up to 512GB
Read Speed: up to 170 MB/s
SD Reader: Yes
Ultra High Speed: UHS-1

Reasons to buy

+
Seriously fast speeds 
+
Durable 
+
Available in bundles 

Reasons to avoid

-
Some sizes are harder to come by 
-
Pricier in higher configurations

Kingston Canvas Go Plus microSDXC SD cards put any fears about transfer rates inside of a Nintendo Switch console firmly to bed. While the company recommends rates of between 60 to 95 MB/s as a minimum, you won't have to worry with these cards as they are rated at a blistering 170 MB/s, over double the official suggestion. 

The speed of the Kingston Canvas Go Plus microSDXC cards isn't their only strength, though. That's because it's common to find them selling at, or cheaper than, the officially licensed counterparts from SanDisk. For instance, a 128GB capacity card will run you $24 at MSRP, though it's frequently available at $20. This is true of the 256GB card, which retails frequently around the $30 mark. 

Although not necessarily marketed towards Nintendo Switch, instead aimed at shooting 4K video, the speed of these cards means that you will have a smooth gameplay experience for a competitive price here. In terms of which capacities offer the best value for money, we recommend either 128GB or 256GB so you won't fill it up any time soon. 

Micro Center premium SD cards on a table

(Image credit: Micro Center)

3. Micro Center Premium microSDXC

The best budget SD cards for Switch

Specifications

Storage: up to 1TB
Read Speed: up to 170 MB/s
SD Reader: Yes
Ultra High Speed: UHS-1

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent price-per-gigabyte 
+
Available in massive capacities 
+
Bundles and multi-packs are common

Reasons to avoid

-
Slower than some other models 

If you're after some of the best value for money then you can't go much cheaper than with Micro Center Premium MicroSDXC cards. Prices start from $7.99 for a 64GB capacity card which would give you far more room for your games at a bargain price. What's more, you won't have to worry about the transfer speeds, as all these SD cards run at 95 MB/s, right at the top end of the scale of Nintendo's recommendation. 

This option becomes stronger when considering some of the higher capacity variations available. If you're someone who wants the most bang for your buck then the 512GB for $60 is about as cheap as it comes. There's also a 1TB version for $120 if you truly never want to run out of storage space again. All told, this price-to-performance cannot really be argued with here. 

SanDisk Extreme 1TB

(Image credit: SanDisk)

4. SanDisk 1TB Extreme microSDXC

The best high capacity SD card for Switch

Specifications

Storage: up to 1TB
Read Speed: up to 190 MB/s
SD Reader: Yes
Ultra High Speed: UHS-1

Reasons to buy

+
Leading performance 
+
Lightning fast 
+
From a trusted brand 

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricier than some other options

Few names are as well regarded in the storage world than SanDisk, and the company's Extreme line of MicroSDXC cards certainly live up to the name. If you're after the fastest available card with the biggest capacity for the Nintendo Switch then look no further than the SanDisk 1TB Extreme. 

It's a pricey investment compared to some other market alternatives, but with its performance of up to 190 MB/s, you won't need to worry about games not running their best. This 1TB configuration retails currently for $165 and frequently sells closer to the $140 mark. That's down from the previous rates of $190, which the card sold at throughout most of 2022 before MSRP was officially lowered. 

Link about to throw a bomb in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

(Image credit: Nintendo)

Best SD cards for Switch FAQs

Do I need an SD card for Nintendo Switch?

If you're someone who primarily downloads their games from the Nintendo eShop then you're going to notice the internal storage filling up fast. After all, you've only got 32GB for the standard model and 64GB on the Switch OLED. Some titles, such as The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (14.4GB), can fill the space quickly. Even a 32GB or 64GB card would give you more to work with. 

Which micro SD cards work on Nintendo Switch?

Nintendo has stated (opens in new tab) that the Nintendo Switch supports three different types of SD cards. These are microSD (up to 2GB), microSDHC (between 4GB and 32GB), and microSDXC (64GB and beyond). We suggest buying a microSDXC card as capacities generally start at 64GB and above. You won't get far going with a smaller capacity than this. A system update may be required to use the micro SD card but should work natively afterward. 

Which size microSD should I get for Nintendo Switch?

We recommend going for capacities of microSD cards between 128GB and 256GB should money allow. Depending on the manufacturer, you can expect to spend between between $18 and $35 this way which would give you all the space for your vast game library without having to worry about it again. 

Aleksha McLoughlin
Hardware Editor

Aleksha McLoughlin is the Hardware Editor for TechRadarGaming and looks after all hardware coverage for the gaming vertical of the site. Prior to joining TRG, she was the Hardware Editor for sister publication GamesRadar+. You’ll also find her hardware coverage and reviews for online publications such as Trusted Reviews, Android Central, The Metro, PC Guide, and Expert Reviews. Outside of gaming, she’s also contributed to the BBC and No Clean Singing, too. In her spare time, you'll often find her at metal gigs and festivals listening to various different shades of black and death metal.