Microsoft's latest Windows update should fix that looping reboot bug

KB3081424 was causing users problems

Update: It looks like Microsoft has a new update in place for Windows 10 that will finally get you out of the reboot loop hell you might have had found yourself in.

While some took it upon themselves to fix the problem within the Microsoft Registry, Mashable is now reporting that Microsoft has said it has issued a new update that fixes the bug caused by the mandatory KB3081424 update, which was released last week.

We'll be contacting Windows for more information on its latest update.

Original article...

Windows 10's launch was never going to go off without a hitch and the latest has some users complaining of being stuck inside Microsoft's own nighmarish version of Narnia: an endless reboot loop.

The KB3081424 update released last week bands together a group of smaller tweaks into one mega-patch designed to make the update process easier, not make it harder for users to get back onto their system, reports The Guardian.

"It downloads, reboot to install. Gets to 30% and reboots. Gets to 59% and reboots. Gets to 59% again and then states something went wrong so uninstalling the update. Wait a few minutes and reboot. Back to login screen. This happens without fail, every single time," according to said Microsoft forum user BrettDM.

Making the problem worse is the fact that Microsoft implemented a new mandatory update system with Windows 10 meaning that users cannot decline the installation like in previous versions of the OS, and this is one of the major reasons for the endless reboot loop.

How to fix it

The only explanation for the original problem comes from the Microsoft forums where a rogue entry in the Windows Registry has been discovered that causes it to fail, and it appears that removing this allows the update to install correctly. Editing this part of the OS, however, can have disastrous effects if things go awry, and most users are advised to steer well clear and wait for an official fix.

To that end Microsoft has yet to give any details on how to repair the problem, although the company can be expected to provide one in due course if it continues to be an issue.