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SAP buys Seewhy to beef up behavioral marketing credentials

Seewhy
Now you SeeWhy

German software powerhouse SAP acquired behavioral marketing expert SeeWhy, on Tuesday, in a bid to strengthen its marketing cloud and integrate some of its features to Hybris, the e-commerce platform, it acquired in June 2013.

In a statement, SAP highlighted SeeWhy's forte, the ability to convert customer interactions into sales by using "1-to-1 personalized marketing based on real-time customer behavior".

Seewhy claims to have helped more than 4000 brands get back around $500 million (about £300m, AU$540m) annually in lost sales. Its secret sauce, as it puts it, is a proprietary solution based on Big Data, In-Memory architecture called Conversion Manager.

Buy, buy, buy

It continuously analyses hundreds of millions of events, crunching them through Seewhy's patented analytics engine and delivering tailored, individual actions, automatically and in real-time to reduce churn and drop-outs.

CORE, as the platform is called, integrates with more than 30 e-commerce, advertising, email service providers, web analytics services and social networks to achieve this level of customer interaction.

Neither SAP nor SeeWhy disclosed details of the transaction but the latter is expected to be completed by the end of June 2014.

SeeWhy's acquisition allows SAP to be better positioned to fend the growing threats of Oracle, Salesforce and IBM which have been investing heavily on enterprise commerce and customer relation marketing solutions.

SAP has been feeling the heat and announced last week that it was laying off around 2500 employees or 3% of its global workforce in a bid to improved its bottom line.

Desire Athow

Managing Editor, TechRadar Pro

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Then followed a weekly tech column in a local business magazine in Mauritius, a late night tech radio programme called Clicplus and a freelancing gig at the now-defunct, Theinquirer, with the legendary Mike Magee as mentor. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global techfests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. He has an affinity for anything hardware and staunchly refuses to stop writing reviews of obscure products or cover niche B2B software-as-a-service providers.