Chip designer ARM is excited about the prospect of Google Chrome OS, according to the company's EVP of Marketing Ian Drew.

Speaking to TechRadar after being name-checked by Google at the unveiling of Chrome OS, Drew admitted that he couldn't predict whether the revolutionary principles behind the new operating system would be successful, but that he wouldn't bet against a company with such a good track record.

"It's really interesting," said Drew. "And I say that for a number of different reasons. Chrome OS extends the thought process of where the web's going and it's quite revolutionary in the way it's put together.

"I don't know whether it will work or not, but three or four years ago people were saying that Android wasn't going to take off and then there were people queuing around the corner for the G1.

"Would I say it's going to be a slam dunk? No. But is it interesting? Yes."

Generation next

Drew points out that, although many have got used to how local apps work, a whole new generation see little difference between the browser and the computer.

"In practical terms, this is really targeting not me but my daughters who use the web for everything, explains Drew.

"It's still a year away from launch which means there is a lot of time for stuff to come together."

Chrome os chess

He continued: "Google is trying to do something revolutionary not evolutionary and nobody can say that they are wrong. We're excited to see it.

"This brings differentiation to the market and from an OEM perspective it brings new challenging business models.

"'How do you use the web?' is a very exciting question now. Is this the final answer? I can't tell you."

Small and ARMless?

Drew is delighted that ARM – a little British company, as he calls it – is now commanding so much attention, although he points out that the focus is as firmly on the company's partners.

"The business model has always been around promoting partners," states Dre.

"But it's really nice to get recognition and really nice to get recognition for our business model.

"It's as much about the ecosystem of ARM and getting recognition for our partners."

Netbook push

ARM's growing profile has seen it transition from its strong mobile phone presence into the world of the netbook, something which clearly enthuses Drew.

"The ARM architecture is enabling the internet story to happen," he says.

"There are more smartphones being sold than laptops and a whole new wave of people on the internet are on ARM and not on anywhere else.

"When netbooks come out on ARM that's another wave of architecture powering the internet."