The best telephoto lenses for Canon and Nikon DSLRs in 2018

The 10 best telephoto zoom lenses for Nikon DSLRs

Nikon telephoto zooms have had something of a shake-up recently. The most popular 70-200mm f/2.8 and 70-300mm FX format (full-frame compatible) lenses have been replaced by new ‘E-type’ models with electromagnetic diaphragms. That’s good news in that you can expect greater exposure consistency throughout a sequence of rapid-fire shots in continuous drive mode. However, compatibility is lost with older Nikon bodies, on which you can only shoot at the widest aperture. That includes the D300s, D3000 and D5000, as well as D1 series and D2 series cameras. The new 70-300mm also features an AF-P ‘Pulse’ stepping motor, which is very fast and completely inaudible in operation, but makes both auto and manual focusing impossible on older bodies, including the D3100, D5100, D7000.

As with other categories of prime and zoom lenses, own-brand Nikkor telephoto zooms face stiff competition from Sigma and Tamron. Indeed, independently manufactured lenses often offer better value for money. However, Sigma and Tamron have largely dropped out of manufacturing DX format (APS-C specific) telephoto zoom lenses, with the exception of a rather unique Sigma that makes it onto our Top 10 list.

1. Nikon AF-S 70-200mm f/2.8E FL ED VR

It’s probably the best telephoto zoom in the world. Ever

Type: Zoom | Sensor size: Full-frame | Focal length: 70-200mm | Maximum aperture: f/2.8 | Image stabilizer: 4 stops | Weather seals: Yes | Minimum focus distance: 1.1m | Filter size: 77mm | Dimensions: 88.5 x 202.5mm | Weight: 1,430g

Tough build, excellent features
Stellar image quality
Heavier than the 70-200mm f/4 lens
Expensive

A feast of high-tech features, this lens ticks every box on the pro-grade wish list. Autofocus is lightning fast and highly accurate, with switchable options for auto or manual priority. In the latter, you can use manual override without waiting for AF to lock onto a subject in tricky conditions. The sophisticated 4-stop VR system includes a Sport mode, which makes it easier to track erratically moving subjects through the viewfinder. The overall construction is really robust but not overly heavy, based on a weather-sealed magnesium barrel. Handling is sublime and image quality is simply fabulous. Sharpness and contrast are mighty throughout the zoom range and at all apertures, whilst the rounded nine-blade diaphragm maintains silky smooth bokeh even when stopping down a little. The older AF-S 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II was an incredible lens, this new version is even better. 

2. Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD G2 for Nikon

Tamron’s next-generation 70-200mm lens is an absolute cracker

Type: Zoom | Sensor size: Full-frame | Focal length: 70-200mm | Maximum aperture: f/2.8 | Image stabilizer: 5 stops | Weather seals: Yes | Minimum focus distance: 0.95m | Filter size: 77mm | Dimensions: 88 x 194mm | Weight: 1,500g

Spectacular performance and IS
Metal barrelled, weather-sealed
Pricey but still a bargain
Hefty for a 70-200mm f/2.8 lens

A complete revamp of Tamron’s previous 70-200mm VC lens, the G2 (Generation 2) has upgraded optics, faster and more accurate autofocus, and 5-stop, triple-mode stabilization. Whereas the older lens’s stabilizer was only really effective for static shots, the new one has static and panning modes, plus a third option in which stabilization is only applied during the exposure. As with Nikon’s ‘Sport VR’ mode, this makes it easier to track erratically moving objects. Build quality is excellent, featuring a weather-sealed metal barrel and keep-clean fluorine coating on the front element. A nice finishing touch is that the magnesium tripod mounting foot is Arca-Swiss compatible. Image quality is stunning in every respect and the lens is compatible with Tamron’s optional TAP-in Console, for applying customisation and firmware updates. It’s practically as good as Nikon’s latest 70-200mm f/2.8 lens, but much less expensive to buy.

3. Nikon AF-S 70-200mm f/4G ED VR

A lightweight lens with a lot to offer, if you don't need a really wide aperture

Type: Zoom | Sensor size: Full-frame | Focal length: 70-200mm | Maximum aperture: f/4 | Image stabilizer: 4 stops | Weather seals: Lens mount gasket | Minimum focus distance: 1m | Filter size: 67mm | Dimensions: 78 x 179mm | Weight: 850g

Superb image quality
Super-fast autofocus
Quite pricey for a budget optic
Not fully weather sealed

The narrower aperture rating of f/4 rather than f/2.8 isn’t an altogether bad thing. It enables this lens to be more compact and lightweight, improving comfort for long periods of handheld shooting. You won't need to worry much about camera shake, either, thanks to a particularly well implemented VR (Vibration Reduction) system that also features automatic panning detection. The lens isn't fully weather-sealed, but does have a sealed mounting plate. Three ED (Extra-low Dispersion) elements and one HRI (High Refractive Index) element, along with Nano-Crystal coatings, help deliver very good sharpness and contrast within minimal ghosting and flare.

4. Sigma APO 70-200mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM for Nikon

Something of an old favourite, it’s a tempting buy at the price

Type: Zoom | Sensor size: Full-frame | Focal length: 70-200mm | Maximum aperture: f/2.8 | Image stabilizer: 4 stops | Weather seals: No | Minimum focus distance: 1.4m | Filter size: 77mm | Dimensions: 86 x 198mm | Weight: 1430g

Image quality and stabilization
Relatively accessible price
Plastic construction
No focus range limiter switch

A relatively old design, this one harks back to the days before Sigma started making ‘Global Vision’ lenses in Art, Contemporary and Sport categories. Even so, it has fast and whisper-quiet ring-type ultrasonic autofocus and dual-mode stabilization that’s worth around 3 stops. Image quality is very good overall, but it’s not quite as sharp as the latest Nikon and Tamron 70-200 f/2.8 lenses, especially when shooting wide-open at f/2.8. It’s also the only lens of the three to lack weather-seals. Even so, it’s capable of excellent results and is a bargain at the price.

5. Nikon AF-P 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6E ED VR

It’s an impressive lens but less of a ‘budget’ option than its predecessor

Type: Zoom | Sensor size: Full-frame | Focal length: 70-300mm | Maximum aperture: f/4.5-5.6 | Image stabilizer: 4.5 stops | Weather seals: Yes | Minimum focus distance: 1.2m | Filter size: 67mm | Dimensions: 81 x 146mm | Weight: 680g

Great image quality and IS
Super-fast, silent autofocus
Much pricier than 'budget' rivals
No focus distance scale

Nikon’s AF-S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G IF-ED VR was something of a legend among budget tele zooms, offering premium performance at a very affordable price. This replacement adds a ‘Pulse’ stepping motor autofocus system that’s both extremely fast and essentially inaudible, even when shooting indoors. Another upgrade is the electromagnetically controlled aperture, for greater exposure consistency in rapid bursts of shooting at high continuous drive speeds. There’s also a new-generation VR system, which delivers 4.5-stop performance and adds a ‘Sport’ mode. This makes it easier to track erratically moving subjects through the viewfinder. Image quality is excellent in all respects and, taking everything into account, this lens justifies the fairly hefty price hike compared its predecessor.

6. Tamron SP 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD for Nikon

Serious tech and very good optics make this great value

Type: Zoom | Sensor size: Full-frame | Focal length: 70-300mm | Maximum aperture: f/4-5.6 | Image stabilizer: 4 stops | Weather seals: No | Minimum focus distance: 1.5m | Filter size: 62mm | Dimensions: 82 x 143mm | Weight: 765g

Performance and image quality
Bargain price
Heavy compared to budget rivals
Variable maximum aperture

Nikon's latest FX-format 70-300mm lens is fabulous, but this Tamron alternative delivers very good performance at a much more affordable price. There's an impressive ring-type autofocus motor which is fast and whisper-quiet, plus an advanced four-stop VC (Vibration Compensation) system. Compared with most Nikon VR lenses, however, stabilization is much less effective when panning. At 765g, it's quite weighty for a 70-300mm lens, but feels solid with refined handling. Image quality is impressive too, with very good sharpness and contrast throughout the zoom range. Color fringing is also well controlled, even into the extreme corners of images.

7. Nikon AF-S DX 55-300MM f/4.5-5.6G ED VR

A cost-effective and capable option for DX-format DSLRs

Type: Zoom | Sensor size: APS-C | Focal length: 55-300mm | Maximum aperture: f/4.5-5.6 | Image stabilizer: 4 stops | Weather seals: No | Minimum focus distance: 1.4m | Filter size: 58mm | Dimensions: 77 x 123mm | Weight: 530g

Relatively large zoom range
Four-stop stabilisation
DX Nikons only
Noticeable distortion at mid zoom

Despite undercutting the newer DX format Nikon 70-300mm for price (listed below), this lens feels more robust and better built. It has a weather-sealed metal mounting plate rather than a basic plastic plate. There cost-cutting elsewhere though, with a conventional autofocus motor that lacks the full-time manual override facility of ring-type ultrasonic systems. VR only gives a 3-stop benefit, lagging behind most of Nikon’s more recent lenses. Image equality is very good, with impressive sharpness throughout the zoom range and low levels of colour fringing. However, distortions are a bit worse than average.

8. Nikon AF-P DX 70-300MM f/4.5-6.3G ED VR

A smoother operator, especially in the autofocus department

Type: Zoom | Sensor size: APS-C | Focal length: 70-300mm | Maximum aperture: f/4.5-6.3 | Image stabilizer: Yes | Weather seals: No | Minimum focus distance: 1.1m | Filter size: 58mm | Dimensions: 72 x 125mm | Weight: 415g

Sharpness is good
VR system works well
Limited compatibility
No body-mounted control

We’re seeing AF-P (Pulse) autofocus systems on a growing number of Nikon lenses. This one is available with or without VR; the edition without stabilisation is a little cheaper to buy. On-board controls are very limited. For example, VR can only be switched off via a menu option in the host camera, and even that isn’t available in some ‘compatible’ Nikon DSLRs. In our tests, the non-VR version of the lens proved slightly sharper than the VR edition. However, the 4-stop stabiliser is well worth having, enabling consistently sharper images in handheld shooting.

9. Nikon AF-S DX 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED VR II

It’s practically a pocket-sized tele zoom, ideal for travel photography

Type: Zoom | Sensor size: APS-C | Focal length: 55-200mm | Maximum aperture: f/4-5.6 | Image stabilizer: Yes | Weather seals: No | Minimum focus distance: 1.1m | Filter size: 52mm | Dimensions: 71 x 83mm | Weight: 300g

Compact, retractable design
Very light in weight
Plasticky build quality
Mediocre image quality

The retractable design of the current Nikon 18-55mm VR makes it a very travel-friendly lens, and this is the telephoto zoom companion. Despite a worthwhile ‘effective’ zoom range of 82.5-300mm, it retracts to a length of just 83mm and weighs in at a mere 300g. To put that into perspective, it’s only a fifth of the weight of most 70-200mm f/2.8 lenses. Autofocus is a little slow, relying on an ultrasonic motor (rather than ring-type) system, and manual override is lacking. Image quality is good rather than great, with sharpness dropping off noticeably at the long end of the zoom range.

10. Sigma 50-100mm F1.8 DC HSM | A for Nikon

What it lacks in telephoto reach, it makes up for in aperture

Type: Zoom | Sensor size: APS-C | Focal length: 50-100mm | Maximum aperture: f/1.8 | Image stabilizer: No | Weather seals: No | Minimum focus distance: 0.95m | Filter size: 82mm | Dimensions: 94 x 171mm | Weight: 1,490g

Super-wide f/1.8 aperture
Excellent build quality
Short maximum focal length
No stabilization

Picking up the baton from Sigma’s unique 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM | A lens for DX format cameras, this one retains the same extra-wide f/1.8 aperture rating while stretching into telephoto territory. To be fair, it doesn’t stretch that far, with an ‘effective’ zoom range of 75-150mm once you take Nikon’s 1.5x crop factor into account. It’s also a relatively big and heavy lens, at about the same size and weight of a 70-200mm f/2.8 lens, and is supplied complete with a tripod collar. Build quality and overall performance are excellent but the combination of relatively short telephoto reach and extra-wide aperture make it a rather specialised lens, arguably better suited to portraiture and still life than to sports and wildlife photography.