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The best Alexa Skills and commands 2021: the ultimate in Amazon Echo tips and tricks

Here's how to make Alexa even smarter

It doesn't have a screen or controllers, but did you know you can play games with Alexa and your Amazon Echo as well?

Because you're using your voice to control the game, and reacting to audio played by an Amazon Echo speaker, the service has already got a number of innovative games to keep you entertained.

Destiny 2 Alexa skill

Okay this first one's a bit of a cheat. No, you're not actually able to play Destiny 2 on your Amazon Echo. 

But the functionality is pretty cool all the same. Using the 'Destiny 2 Ghost' skill (opens in new tab) you'll be able to ask for details on the game's story and characters, as well as get details that are specific to your character. You can ask if your friends are currently online, and you'll be able to get recommendations on what to do next in the game. 

Skyrim Alexa skill

Yep, you're reading that right. Bethesda's biggest title landed on Alexa during summer 2018. Called Skyrim: A Very Special Edition, the spin-off is an audio-based version of the popular game that you play using a series of voice commands.

It's a bit like a choose-your-own-adventure story where audio clips tell you what's happening and then stop, so you can decide what happens next. Your response then guides the game to the next scenario, and so on.

The Magic Door Alexa skill

The Magic Door is one of the most popular Alexa gaming skills for the Amazon Echo. It plays like a choose-your-own-adventure novel where Alexa reads out a story then asks you for choices.

You can find items, solve riddles, and try to make it out alive by choosing the right call, and new stories are regularly being added to keep you playing.

Best Alexa skills

Best Alexa skills

The Wayne Investigation Alexa skill

Comic book fans will love this Alexa game, as it allows you to investigate the death of Bruce Wayne's parents.

Like The Magic Door, it plays as a choose-your-own-adventure story, and it's launched with an "Alexa, open The Wayne Investigation" voice command. Every choice you make changes the outcome of the game, and by using your voice to interact with Alexa and study clues, you genuinely start to feel a little like Batman.

When In Rome Alexa skill

You will need to purchase the When In Rome board game to use this skill, which is available on Amazon at a reduced price in the US of $19.99, or full price in the UK for £24.99 and Australia for around AU$43 - but if you love games, it's definitely worth it.

When In Rome combines the classic board game with voice assistance, meaning Alexa guides you through the game as you 'travel' the world and answer trivia questions from real locals.

Meditation Alexa skill

There are a lot of Alexa skills created to help you meditate. And the good news is many use a soothing different voice to the one you've become accustomed to from Alexa. Which is great, but not always calming. We like the new Mindfulness : One minute meditation (opens in new tab) Alexa skill, which features a range of guided meditations you can play instantly, including a body scan or gratitude practice, as well as the super popular Headspace (opens in new tab) Alexa skill.

NASA Alexa skill

If you can't get enough space, there are lots of Alexa skills specially designed to keep you up-to-date with all the latest news from the Cosmos. We like the NASA Mars (opens in new tab) Alexa skill, which enables you to learn about Mars, get the latest rover updates, and see the latest images directly from NASA. The Space Station (opens in new tab) skill is also fun, providing you with the real-time location of the International Space Station, along with information about the astronauts who are currently working on it.

Jon Porter is the ex-Home Technology Writer for TechRadar. He has also previously written for Practical Photoshop, Trusted Reviews, Inside Higher Ed, Al Bawaba, Gizmodo UK, Genetic Literacy Project, Via Satellite, Real Homes and Plant Services Magazine, and you can now find him writing for The Verge.