The Camino project has been running alongside the development of Mozilla almost since its inception, though recently it has been usurped by Firefox. It's still a strong contender, and the use of Mozilla's Gecko rendering engine means it's welcome at the websites of most banks.

The idea is to take the core of Mozilla and add a dash of OS X styling to make it integrate with the system better, so the strengths of Firefox are also the strengths of Camino, but the weaknesses are addressed to create a more native-like application. Such is the success of this project, it was thought that Apple would choose it as the basis for Safari.

In addition to the benefits of Firefox, which include an active developer community, good standards compliance and excellent tabbed browsing, Camino also has some unique features such as the Top Ten list, which makes the ten most visited bookmarks available by right-clicking the application icon in the Dock, and really good integration with the OS X Services menu. It also adheres closely to Apple Human Interface Guidelines, and so shouldn't pose any problems for those more used to Safari.

However, it loses a few of the features that make Firefox so useful for the active web user such as RSS bookmarks, multiple homepages and access to the various extensions created by the Firefox community.

Camino is a browser that deserves more attention. It is a good compromise between the accessibility of Firefox (in terms of support from webmasters) and Safari, but seems not to inspire the fanaticism of either

If Camino included the RSS facilities of Firefox, it would be the definitive OS X browser. So if RSS isn't high on your wish list, Camino is definitely worth a try.