Sony believes that half of all televisions made in 2014 will be 3D-capable, according to comments made by a senior Sony Computer Entertainment Europe (SCEE) exec at this week's GamesCom event in Germany.

Mick Hocking, Senior Director for SCEE's Studio Liverpool, predicts that the high launch prices for 3DTVs and consumer's dislike of ugly 3D specs will are just temporary issues and will not limit the take-up of the tech in the next few years.

Gaming to drive 3D adoption

Hocking is obviously a man that wants 3D TVs to succeed, as he is in charge of PlayStation Worldwide Studio's 3D development.

He makes the bold prediction that predicts that half of all televisions made in 2014 will be 3D-capable, and that the prices will drop considerably as economies of scale kick in.

"I think 3D gaming is huge. There are many, many benefits that 3D brings to games, but in general it enhances your sense of immersion. Your eyes pick up a lot more information than with 2D," said the SCEE Director.

"If you do produce 3D games in the right way it is a stunning experience and justifies the need to put glasses on and buy that TV. If not done well it's just used to add depth, or worse, it can put people off.

"3D done right isn't just about adding depth to a scene it is a creative medium. There are choices about how much depth you put into a scene depending on what you're after, whether it is to create a sense of suspense or vertigo."

3D cameras and movies

FujiFilm is one of the first consumer camera brands to support 3D, launching its latest 3D-capable camera earlier this month. And lots more 3D Blu-ray discs are set to arrive in stores very soon, in time for the busy Christmas holiday season.

Yet it is gaming that Sony hopes will drive the mass adoption of 3D in our homes. And as for the games that will make 3D TVs seem far more desirable to the average punter, Hocking admits:

"My completely unbiased opinion is Motorstorm Apocalypse. Killzone 3 has a great sense of vertigo, especially in the jetpack levels, but Motorstorm has things blowing up all around you and past you."

Via Kotaku