As more and more consumers adopt smartphones and tablets compatible with 3G and 4G networks, the airspace has gotten a bit more crowded.

Though companies like Apple, Samsung, Research in Motion and Nokia are thrilled with the sales numbers, all are seeking more bandwith for customers.

The Hill reported Wednesday that multiple tech companies signed a letter sent to Congress asking for the U.S. government to open up more frequencies for mobile data.

While the spectrum isn't quite packed to capacity yet, all of the signing companies are hoping to clear up some more room before such a situation becomes a probability.

The highest bidders

In the letter, the coalition of companies claimed "authorizing new spectrum auctions is timely and relevant" in regards to the much-discussed "fiscal cliff."

The companies also asked the Democrats and Republicans to look into the possibility of auctioning off frequencies currently used by only federal agencies.

"Now is the time to ensure the incentive auctions are as robust and successful as possible at liberating spectrum," the letter stated.

"We should also turn our collective attention on ways to reap the economic benefits of underutilized federal spectrum assets."

Back in September, the FCC approved the auctioning off of some television frequencies, which will allow mobile traffic to expand to more than 30 times its current amount by 2015.

Apparently, that just wasn't enough for the companies involved in the writing of this letter to Congress, as many also claimed technologies to make spectrum use more efficient won't be enough to satisfy demand for broadband data.

What happens with this proposal now is anyone's guess, but apparently the clock is ticking on mobile airwave space.

Hopefully, Congress and the FCC can figure out an arrangement that will be beneficial to not just these companies, but the consumers as well.

Via The Hill