Pricing details for Xbox Music, Microsoft's upcoming all-in-one music service, may have been leaked on Wednesday by an Xbox 360 dashboard update beta user.

The pricing details were corroborated by information spotted in the Windows 8 Music app.

But it turns out the numbers spotted on Wednesday were only half the story, as the prices - which were leaked in British pounds - may not translate directly to U.S. dollars.

A new leak on Thursday revealed that Americans could get a significantly better deal on Xbox Music passes, if the latest image is to be believed.

New Xbox Music pricing details

The new image shows Xbox Music pricing that's practically two-thirds of what U.K. users will pay.

Wednesday's leaks showed prices of UK£89 (US$146, AU$141) for a full year's subscription or UK£8.99 (US$14.50, AU$14) for a month's Xbox Music sub.

But according to the latest report, it seems Xbox Music could cost a mere $99.90 or $9.99 for a year's or month's subscription, respectively, in the States.

The new image leak also shows the same 14-day free trial that the U.K. appears to get, but adds an additional option for a free 30-day Music Pass trial. At this time it's unknown what the difference is.

Is Xbox Music worth it?

The Xbox Music service was first announced at E3 in June, and rumors later that month claimed that the service would offer music streaming and downloads on the Xbox 360, Windows PCs and tablets, and Windows Phone devices, as well as cloud storage.

The latest leaks have supported that information, including the possible revelation of Xbox Music cloud playlists, though so far Microsoft has refused to confirm any of the information we are seeing.

Another source on Wednesday, a forum user on NeoGAF, claimed that Microsoft will also offer a free, ad-supported music streaming pass through Xbox Music that will be designed to compete directly with Spotify.

On Wednesday, a Microsoft spokesperson informed TechRadar that the company wouldn't comment on the Xbox Music leaks, adding simply that Xbox Music will be Microsoft's "definitive music service" and promised to reveal more information as soon as it's available.

Via Engadget