Samsung galaxy fit review

The Samsung Galaxy Fit is based around Android 2.2, with a little help from Samsung in the form of skinning.

For example each of the three home screens has a fixed row of shortcuts along the bottom providing access to the dialler, contacts, messaging and the full apps list.

Samsung galaxy fit review

Adding shortcuts to any of the main screens is a simple matter of long-pressing and choosing whether you want to add a widget, shortcut or folder, or change the wallpaper.

There's not a huge range of widgets to choose from. On these lower-end smartphones Samsung doesn't generally go to town on these types of extras. But we did like the Program Monitor widget.

Samsung galaxy fit review

We've seen the Program Monitor before. It displays the number of apps currently running, and if you tap it you're taken into the Active Applications area so you can close any you don't need.

Samsung galaxy fit review

If you find the system starting to run slowly (and you probably will) this is a handy way of shutting down anything that is hogging memory resources.

Samsung galaxy fit review

You can get to this by long-pressing the Home button too. Then you see a list of recent apps, and there's a permanent link to the active applications area – Android calls it the Task Manager.

It is a good job you have such easy access to the Task Manager, because the processor runs at 600MHz and noticeably slows down as you have more and more apps opened.

Samsung galaxy fit review

The main apps menu is a very familiar-looking beast, with apps arranged across three screens. The shortcuts along the bottom of the screens remain intact and the way they are on the home screens, with dialler, contacts and messaging replicated and an additional shortcut out to the home screen.