Samsung epic 4g touch review

The 8MP rear-facing camera on the Samsung Epic 4G Touch is simply outstanding - one of the best we've tested. Our test photos turned out clear and bright, with an unusually high pixel resolution. Even in low-light conditions, the camera sensor still managed to capture a clear image with or without flash.

You can press a finger to choose where to focus - the camera responded faster for focusing on that area than the Motorola Atrix 2, which seemed to pause for half a second first.

Scene modes are more extensive than most - there's one for Fireworks at night, Fall colours, Dawn light and even Candlelight (instead of just background low light).

Better yet, the scene modes actually work. Even on a dismal autumn day, the Fall colour mode made colours pop a bit more realistically.

Samsung epic 4g touch review

FALL COLOURS: Notice the bright sky and deeper browns - the Fall colours scene mode brought out richer tones.

Samsung epic 4g touch review

LOW LIGHT: In this shot of a snowman in low light, the Epic 4G Touch still managed to make the photo bright

Samsung epic 4g touch review

TEXT: The Samsung Epic 4G Touch has a text photo scene mode that makes text look more crisp and readable.

Other settings include the ability to shoot multiple frames in a row, reduce or enhance exposure, change the focus mode, add effects such as greyscale and sepia, set white balance and reduce phone shake.


The shutter speed can be changed from a low of 100 up to a high of 800. A unique "blink detection" setting is intended to help you know that a subject is blinking, although we found this mode didn't work properly - we could still snap photos of someone blinking.

You can turn on guides, a review mode that shows each photo after you take it and a GPS tag that adds location data to the photo. You can also set image quality and resolution. 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Contributor

John Brandon (Twitter, Google+) has covered gadgets and cars for the past 12 years having published over 12,000 articles and tested nearly 8,000 products. He's nothing if not prolific. Before starting his writing career, he led an Information Design practice at a large consumer electronics retailer in the US. His hobbies include deep sea exploration, complaining about the weather, and engineering a vast multiverse conspiracy.