As with many Windows Phones, the 1730 mAh battery held within the HTC Titan II is sadly non-removable – and the talk time rating of 4.3 hours (12.2 days of standby time) didn't inspire a whole lot of confidence about the handset's longevity.

But the battery proves surprisingly capable with moderate use of the phone, as we were able to get through a day with a handful of calls and texts, regular email and occasional browser usage, and listening to locally stored music.

htc titan II review

As usual, heavy use of the 4G LTE connection for calls or data can drain the battery with ease, and the HTC Titan II does become quite warm with steady use, which is a bit disconcerting.

But as long as you're not spending the entire day with your eyes trained on the screen, the battery puts up a pretty good fight. Optional battery-saving features are built into the OS if you wish to turn off email retrieval and multitasking to save precious battery percentage.

Connectivity

The mini-USB output on the HTC Titan II lets you connect the phone to a PC or Mac for file transfer, which as detailed previously relies on the Zune software for the former or the Windows Phone 7 Connector app on the latter.

With just 16GB of internal storage and no SD card slot, you're limited to a little more than 14GB of available formatted space for media and downloaded apps. It's awfully confining.

htc titan II review

As noted earlier, the 4G LTE speeds on AT&T's network proved underwhelming when used in Chicago, where we've experienced fantastic performance on Verizon's network, though the phone also supports Wi-Fi and certainly works well using that kind of connection. Bluetooth 2.1+ is also available for connecting with headsets and other devices.

The phone also includes an Internet Sharing function for creating a local Wi-Fi hotspot using the 4G LTE data plan, though we weren't able to test it out on this review handset.