The HTC One SV comes equipped with a 5MP camera which is disappointing considering for the same money you can pick up the One S which not only has a better screen and faster processor, but also an 8MP snapper.

On top of this the One SV is priced towards the top end of the mid-range smartphone bracket and all its rivals sport 8MP cameras including the Nexus 4 and 8X while the Xperia T boasts 13MP.

HTC One SV review

Thankfully there is a single LED flash round the back with gives the One SV back some credibility but the promise of 1080p video raises our suspicions over quality, but more on that in the next section.

Something which has been given a bump on the HTC One SV is the front facing camera which is now 1.6MP making for smoother, clearer video calls and more in-depth vanity checks – lovely.

HTC One SV review

The camera application can be accessed easily from the default shortcuts on the lockscreen as well as from the icon in the app list, opening up in a jiffy meaning there's hardly any time to wait before you can get snapping.

HTC has waved its Sense wand over the application giving it a different look and feel to the stock Android offering, but it's beautifully simple to use.

HTC One SV review

You get large shutter and record buttons on the right of the screen, with a link to the gallery below and the effects menu above.

There are 15 effects to choose from including distortion, vignette and greyscale allowing you to create a unique photo.

HTC One SV review

Camera scenes such as HDR and panorama are also supported on the HTC One SV and you can easily toggle the flash by hitting the button in the top left corner of the screen.

A digital zoom lets you get closer to the subject you're shooting, but quality dramatically diminishes so we'd recommend leaving the slider well alone.

HTC One SV review

Picture quality as you may have already guessed is a little lack-lustre, especially when you compare the snaps against those taken on rival handsets.

Photos lack clarity and colour and you're left with results which wouldn't look out of place on a budget handset – but the HTC One SV will set you back over £300. Poor show.

HTC One SV review

You can tweak the effects, scene modes and variables such as white balance and contrast but at the end of the day it is what it is – a poor camera on a phone which is demanding more money than it possibly should.

HTC One SV review
In daylight the One SV performs well, although it's not pin sharp

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HTC One SV review
It got a little confused on what to focus on here

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HTC One SV review
The train pulling in is a little blurred

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HTC One SV review
The One SV fails to pick out backlit objects

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HTC One SV review
At night the One SV doesn't perform well

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HTC One SV review
Without HDR the One SV can't really pick out this building

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HTC One SV review
HDR does improve the image, but the quality is still poor

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HTC One SV review
Automatic macro mode kicks in with close up shots

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