Being a Samsung device one of the key areas to be looked at has to be the screen. Unfortunately we've yet to see a tablet from the Korean giant that comes with the same pop and sparkle that accompanies the Super AMOLED screens that ship on the Galaxy S5.

However, the Galaxy Tab Pro 10.1 still manages to put in a more than decent shift.

There's no doubt that the occasional auto-brightness issue left me feeling a little frustrated, but generally the Tab Pro 10.1 was bright and usable whilst out and about, should you decide to do a bit of mobile web browsing or take a snap on the 8MP camera.

Samsung Galaxy Pro 10.1

Color reproduction was also second to none, something that has come to be a trademark of Samsung devices. This meant that watching videos on the 10.1-inch screen was superb, and it gave that extra edge to mobile gaming.

The high specs are also continued inside the Galaxy Tab Pro 10.1, shipping with an octa-core Exynos CPU powered by four 1.9GHz cores and four 1.3GHz cores. This means that whilst browsing the web sat in front of the television was a breeze; pages loaded as quickly as Wi-Fi would allow.

Heavy lifting was also carried off with aplomb. Throughout my time with the Galaxy Tab Pro 10.1 I only found that the CPU stuttered once.

That was during initial set up as nigh-on every app that came pre-installed had an update located on the Play Store, and throwing YouTube browsing its way left the Tab Pro 10.1 hesitating a few seconds before bringing up the latest edition of the Phone Show.

Apps Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro 10.1

2GB of RAM also helped the Tab Pro 10.1 take the strain, although this was a little disappointing given that there are 3GB found inside the Galaxy Note 3. That said I never found this to be a problem.

Samsung has also thrown in a variety of differing business-focused apps, from its own e-Meeting and Remote PC apps to Cisco's WebEx. This means that the Galaxy Tab Pro range will certainly be sitting on the radar of many IT departments.

Knox Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro 10.1

Also included is Samsung's Knox software. This provides not only a protected section on the tablet for file storage, but also a secure connection to the outside world via the internet app, as well as a host of other apps that can be found through the Samsung App Store.

Despite its current troubles there is no doubt that BlackBerry still has a certain hold over the business world thanks to its reputation for security, but this is an area that Samsung is definitely starting to break ground in.