In most tests, the XFX offers equivalent performance than the bulk of the 5770s we tested. Worth noting is that it scored the lowest in our Heaven 2.1 Tessellation test, but only by 0.1 FPS.

We'd likely attribute this to the smaller, slightly less-powerful cooler allowing the heat – and resistance – to rise. But in real-world gaming terms, its marginally lower scores in some tests are unnoticeable; the competition really is that close.

The really interesting thing about the XFX HD 5770 is what its price represents. Now, the 5770 generally speaking, is a reasonably capable mid-range card. We burned these babies with high AA and AF setting in our tests, but drop those settings a little and you do see the frame rate rise.

But at just £116, our thoughts turn to Crossfire setups. For just over £230, you can net yourself a twin-card setup, which would offer pretty kick-ass performance at mid-range resolutions of 1680 x 1050.

If you're content with that 22" monitor and want zingy performance on a budget, this is probably the cheapest way to achieve it. At a price equivalent to Nvidia's 285, which such a setup will blow out of the water, it's pretty mouth-watering. Oh, and did we mention the 5770 is DX11 capable? Yum.

And that's what that lower price-point really represents: the prospect of a twin-card CrossFire setup, and a pretty feisty one at that.



We liked

Capable performance, at a lower price than pretty much every other 5770. That makes it a real candidate for a Crossfire setup, and the gateway to tasty mid-resolution frame rates in DX11.

We disliked

No frills; no bundle to speak of; just the facts, Jack.

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