Pure's good reputation is further fuelled by brother number three in Pure's Evoke range. What differs from its forebears is the combination of a larger screen with massive recording capabilities - up to 1GB from its front-loaded SD card slot.

The times they are a changing

This gives you a total of 15hrs, with up to 20 timed recordings being set simply from the EPG that gives access to the next seven days' worth of radio listings.

However, the EPG is frustratingly slow to update. Also, there isn't even a small SD card included in the Evoke-3 package.

The secret behind the Evoke-3's overall success, is its simplicity despite that plethora of recording options. Its ReVu feature allows around 50mins of live radio to be recorded even without a SD card, and while its controls do sully the unit's otherwise clean appearance, its classy retro shell is appealing.

The same goes for the its D-shaped 3in drive unit speakers, which spew plenty of bass to accompany the full sound. Although dialogue is this DAB radio's main strength, the speakers behave well with music and a harshness only creeps in at very high volumes.

The Evoke-3 is also thoroughly portable, including a battery hub either for six size C batteries or a ChargePAK. Fully charged, a ChargePAK supplies around 10hrs of listening.

Connectivity is also strong. The USB input means that the radio's software can be updated online.

An optical audio output pipes sound to an amplifier, and analogue inputs and outputs mean that an iPod, CD player or MiniDisc can be connected. It can also play MP3s stored on SD cards.

Straightforward and innovative, the Evoke-3 can also be used as decent iPod speakers as well, despite the unit's chunky nature.

Two style icons in harmony: now there's a tale for the Naughties. If only it came in white.