Fuji X M1 review

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Colours straight from the Fuji X-M1 are bright and punchy without being overly saturated. To increase the vibrancy, you can choose to shoot in the classic Velvia simulation mode.

Fuji X M1 review

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The new 16-50mm kit lens is a flexible option for your first lens, and offers an equivalent of 24-76mm in 35mm terms. Fuji claims that this lens is a better performer than standard kit lenses, and we've certainly found it very capable during our test.

Fuji X M1 review

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Even when shooting at high sensitivities (this image is ISO 1600), the Fuji X-M1 is capable of resolving a large amount of detail. Examining this image at 100% does reveal some image smoothing in the fine knits, but considering it was shot at ISO 1600, the sensor has coped well.

Fuji X M1 review

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General purpose metering does a good job of helping to produce balanced exposures even when the contrast in a scene is a high. To get even better results, switch to spot metering.

Fuji X M1 review

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There's plenty of detail in this shot, while image stabilisation has done a good job of keeping the image blur-free, despite it being a hand-held shot.

Fuji X M1 review

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The number of lenses available for the Fuji X system is fairly limited, though it is growing. This image was shot with the 60mm f/2.8 optic.

Fuji X M1 review

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When shooting under artificial lighting, the Fuji X-M1 has a tendency to err towards warmer tones, so it might be preferable to switch to a more specific white balance setting if the camera is struggling.

Fuji X M1 review

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The new 27mm f/2.8 pancake lens is a good carry around option, because it gives an equivalent focal length of around 41mm. With its capability to shoot as wide as f/2.8, it's also useful when light levels drop.

Fuji X M1 review

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The 60mm f/2.8 lens makes an ideal lens for shooting portraits, because it helps to capture the maximum amount of detail and is roughly equivalent to 90mm.

Fuji X M1 review

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You can also choose to shoot in black and white by using film simulation modes. These enable you to shoot in raw format, so if you change your mind about the simulation down the line, you can work with a 'clean' version.

Digital filters

A number of digital filters are available on the Fuji X-M1, which can be accessed via the Advanced section of the mode dial. Images shot with these filters can only be shot in JPEG format.

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Fuji X M1 review

Miniature filter

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Fuji X M1 review

Pop Colour filter

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Fuji X M1 review

High Key filter

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Fuji X M1 review

Low Key filter

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Fuji X M1 review

Dynamic Tone filter

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Fuji X M1 review

Soft Focus filter

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

News Reporter

Amy (Twitter, Google+, blog) is a freelance journalist and photographer. She worked full-time as the News Reporter / Technical Writer (cameras) across Future Publishing's photography brands and TechRadar between 2009 and 2014 having become obsessed with photography at an early age. Since graduating from Cardiff Journalism School, she's also won awards for her blogging skills and photographic prowess, and once snatched exhibition space from a Magnum photographer.