Ricoh GR Digital IV review

BLACK AND WHITE: An example of the Ricoh GR Digital IV's in-camera black and white processing. A high-contrast mono effect is also available, as is a range of toning options.

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Ricoh GR Digital IV review

MACRO: Close focusing is excellent with the Ricoh GR Digital IV. Macro Target focusing enables you to place the focus point precisely, while the new Camera Shake Correction helps to reduce blur when shooting at such magnification.

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Ricoh GR Digital IV review

CONTRAST: Metering is generally good, although this backlit white sheet required some positive compensation to bring back the brightness. For high-contrast conditions, the Dynamic Range scene mode is excellent, combining two separate exposures automatically.

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Ricoh GR Digital IV review

CROSS PROCESS: The range of image settings are particularly good, with parameters such as contrast, vividness and vignetting being manually adjustable for each. This portrait was shot at ISO 400 using the Cross Process effect.

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Ricoh GR Digital IV review

COMPOSITE: The Ricoh GR Digital IV's multi-exposure mode enables you to capture up to five images in succession. These are then automatically combined into a single composite. An Interval Composite Scene mode can also be used to capture a time-lapse composite of subjects such as star trails.

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Ricoh GR Digital IV review

MONTAGE: No HD movies, no panorama mode... the Ricoh GR Digital IV might not have all the gimmicks, but it's still got some creative tricks up its sleeve, including a Stream Continuous mode that captures up to 16 frames in two seconds and produces a single montage JPEG using them.

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Ricoh GR Digital IV review

LITTLE FRINGING: Chromatic aberration is well controlled by the Ricoh GR Digital IV, with purple fringing around high contrast areas being very minimal during our testing period.

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