Usability

Sony has really tried to improve its smart interface for 2014. The addition of a Discover menu certainly streamlines content finding, and once you get used to it (which does take a little time) the new One-Flick remote turns out to be well-judged.

Sony's prowess at applying the right picture presets to the right sources also saves tons of time that might normally have to be spent calibrating images manually.

Sony Bravia KDL-55W955

On the downside, it's a pity Sony doesn't give you any real means of sorting apps in its 'store' by category, leaving you having to scroll through everything to find specific app types you're after.

The decision to put the main adjustment menus and smart menus all on the same screen, with the adjustment menus relegated to tiny icons to the picture's top right, feels like an unnecessary over-complication. It would have been easier to just give each set of menus their own dedicated remote control button and starting page.

Sound

So has the wedge transformed TV sound? Sort of. Certainly it's allowed Sony to use larger drive units this time round than it could on last year's equivalent models, this does lead to a more open, dynamic sound.

It's probably the best example of TV audio we've heard from a set with down-firing speakers, despite the fact that Sony's 2013 audio efforts seemed to have inspired a frenzy of audio improvement from other brands too.

Sony KDL-55W955

I can't quite forget how brilliant the front-firing speakers found on Sony's upcoming 4K TVs are sounding. But you could say there's no point dwelling on features that are only found on much more expensive TVs.

Value

When you think that Samsung's flagship 55-inch HD TV, the 55H8000, will set you back a cool £2,300, you could argue that the £1600 Sony is asking for the 55W955 doesn't look unreasonable.

However, while Samsung's set is excellent, Sony's isn't. In fact, I feel strongly that I'd rather watch Sony's 50W829 – a set which also goes considerably easier on your wallet than the 55W955.