It might seem expensive, but the LH-RH760TF is no ordinary one-box system. It's a DVD player, DVD/HDD recorder, 5.1 surround sound system and multimedia jukebox wrapped up in one convenient package.

The generous 160GB hard disk inside the handsome-looking main unit holds up to 233 hours of recordings, and it can record onto every type of recordable DVD except DVD-R Dual-Layer.

It also boasts video upscaling to 720p and 1080i through the HDMI socket, DiVX, MP3, WMA and JPEG playback, plus an RDS FM/ AM radio tuner.

Sadly the built-in TV tuner is analogue only and there's no DVD-Audio support, but otherwise this is one of the best-specified systems money can buy.

It's not short on sockets either. Alongside HDMI are two RGB-capable Scarts (input and output) and progressive scan capable component video output. On the front is an i.Link input for recording from DV camcorders and a USB port.

There are four recording quality presets, plus an MPEG-4 (XViD) recording feature for portable devices. You can also transfer MP3/WMA, DiVX and JPEG files from disc or USB device to the hard-disk and create a multimedia library.

As for editing, you can easily delete, combine and divide sections on HDD, but strangely the Playlist editing feature is only available on DVD-RW (VR) and DVD-RAM discs.

The system is extremely easy to set up. The speaker cables are plugged into springclip terminals on the back of the sub, while the gorgeous NXT flatpanel tallboy speakers slot easily onto their stands.

Once it's up and running, the basic functions are simple to master thanks to the thoughtfully laid-out remote and snazzy onscreen menus.

Recording quality from an external digibox is superb, demonstrated by the dazzling reproduction of Lost: Season 3 on Sky One HD. In XP and SP modes, the luscious greens of the jungle and the blue sky are vivid and noise free, while there's plenty of detail packed into the picture.

LP and EP are jittery and ridden with block noise, but that's par for the course.

DVD playback is also excellent, due mainly to the inclusion of HDMI output, which ensures the cleanest, sharpest images possible no matter what resolution it's set to. The recent three-disc Extended Edition of Gladiator looks gloriously sharp and vivid.

Audio isn't as controlled as recent systems from the likes of Pioneer and Philips, but once you've trimmed the over-eager subwoofer it provides decent results.

The coliseum fights in Gladiator are an absolute riot, with jolting bass, precise, detailed rear effects, unmuffled speech and engaging front channels.

A digital tuner and DVD-A would have been nice, but overall the LH-RH760TF's admirable performance, suave looks and abundant features make it well worth the asking price.