"That's a great idea - they will get more light with that - but it doesn't take advantage of everything that the lasers can do."

Resolutionary

When we touch on the 4K revolution in television and how important resolution is to IMAX, Bonnick explains why the company has not jumped on the bandwagon just yet.

"We've been capturing content for 40 years at super high-res so the advent of digital 2k and 4k makes us think 'we've been there.'

"Our view of the world is that a lot of people latch onto resolution as 'that's the big thing' but it's one of many things that come together to make the perfect experience.

"So we did some testing of 4K and we found some anomalies - it had higher resolution, which was good, but we found that it did not have as high contrast as a 2K system, and contrast is one the most important things to a filmmaker.

IMAX - futureproofing itself
IMAX - futureproofing itself

"Secondly...not even our image enhancer for our dual-camera projectors allows us to align properly for 4K, and thirdly nobody is creating 4K content currently but are they going to be soon?

"We looked at where we were going with our laser tech which will be 4k and we come right back to those points and have to ask 'how are we going to solve them now?'

"So we're working on a new technology called hyper-projection which, in the the lay sense, you present what appears to be a low resolution image (it's not) from one projector and a high detailed image which is very sharp from the other projector - neither picture on its own is particularly attractive but when they get superimposed your brain melds the two images and create this pristine image which eliminates all of the artefacts."

We were beginning to wonder if our 4K televisions and high end audio systems were making the sofa a more appealing place to watch films than a cinema, but laser beams are certainly likely to make us think again.

Is it the silver bullet for the silver screen?