Déjà Dup

Deja dup

Duplicity, the command line gem that offers such features as remote backups and encrypted incremental archives, is just too exhaustive to cover here. Still, we've managed to find the best graphical front-end to Duplicity around: the brilliant Déjà Dup.

It isn't the only option, though. In fact, if you really insist on using a terminal, try Duply – an Ncurses-based Duplicity front-end. There aren't many dependencies to worry about here, but you will need NcFTP, which is available in Ubuntu's software repositories and is the default Gnome backup tool of Fedora 13.

Like all other tools we've discussed so far, Déjà Dup enables you to store backups on the local filesystem or a remote location using SSH.

When you launch Déjà Dup from the Applications > System Tools menu, don't let the simplistic interface throw you off. Use Edit > Preferences to fill in settings such as backup location and the files you'd like to back up. In the Preferences window, check the Automatically Backup On A Regular Schedule box and select Daily, Weekly, Biweekly, or Monthly from the How Often To Backup: drop-down list.

It's worth noting that Déjà Dup doesn't give you the option to create backup sets, even though it does support incremental backups. You should also know that, depending on the Backup Location specified under Preferences, Déjà Dup only offers the respective backups to restore.

For example, if you back up your pictures in a directory called pics and your videos in vids, when the Preferences dialog is pointed to pics, you'll only restore your pictures backup. That's cool, but where's the documentation explaining this, eh?

Verdict

Déjà Dup
Version: 14.1
Website
Price: Free/GPL

A podium contender that offers encryption and incremental backups

Rating: 9/10

Backerupper

Backerupper

Although not available in the software repositories of any big-league distributions yet, Backerupper is still popular having received extensive blogosphere coverage. The tarball contains an install.sh script if you wish to install Backerupper to disk, but it works just as well without installation. Simply double-click the backer executable file.

The first step when working with Backerupper is to create a profile. To do this, click New. Provide a name and fill in the information required, such as the destination directory. Unfortunately, Backerupper won't back up individual files – it only works with directories.

Another shortcoming is that it doesn't perform incremental backups. Still, it does offer to automatically back up a specified directory if you so wish. When creating a profile, carefully choose the Max Backup Copies value.

Instead of creating incremental backups, Backerupper creates a compressed tarball of the specified directory each time it creates a backup. So, with the Max Backup Copies option you get to specify how many older versions of the backup to retain. For example, with Max Backup Copies set to one (default), a backup. tar.gz containing the Pictures folder would be replaced with backup-1.tar.gz the next time you back up the Pictures directory. If disk space isn't an issue, you may wish to keep at least two or three older backup copies.

With a backup in place, click the Restore tab at the top of the Backerupper window and then select a profile and, if you've set Max Backup Copies to a value of two or more, the associated backup you wish to restore.

Verdict

Backerupper
Version: 0.24
Website
Price: Free/GPL

Not actively developed and pales in comparison to others here

Rating: 5/10