Now you won't go to prison for ripping your own CDs

Time to burn your CDs, DVDs and other content

The government has finally woken up and changed the law to allow people to make digital copies of their copyrighted CD eBook and movie collections without fear of reprimand.

Sure, people have been burning CDs for years and the police haven't come a knocking, but at least this practice is now completely guilt free.

The inclusion of movies being allowed to be copied onto a digital format should have been a boon for many who want their vast DVD libraries converted into a form which can easily be transferred between PC, laptop, tablet and smartphone.

However, it's still illegal to remove the 'TPM' (technical protection method), so the biggest barrier remains in place for most consumers.

Sharing still a no no

Of course all this activity is strictly for personal consumption only, as soon as you start sharing any of your newly created files with anyone else the long arm of the law will be poking you on the shoulder.

And it's okay to store your copies in the cloud as well, with the government ignoring suggestions from rights holders that anything online is ripe for piracy.

If you feel especially hard done to that your movie and TV content is still almost impossible to legally take from a disc and on to your tablet you are allowed to complain to the Secretary of State.

But according to the Giovernment's document they can simply point you in the direction of somewhere were you can BUY a digital copy.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Phones and Tablets Deputy Editor

John (Twitter, Google+) got his first phone aged 12 and since then he's been fixated on all things mobile, churning his way through a multitude of handsets, tablets and operating systems. Signalling his arrival at TechRadar by becoming a Guinness World Record holder in his first week (for the highest score on Super Mario Bros using a giant controller), John hasn't looked back since.