Promising to end the frustration of a patchy Wi-Fi network, Echobox is an adapter that allows you to get an Ethernet connection from your coaxial aerial ports.

It's a straightforward device that just plugs into your aerial port and means you don't have to invest in any extra wiring for additional internet access points.

Obviously you'll need to plug your computer, smart TV or games console into the Ethernet port on the box, but it then leaves the Wi-Fi for your mobile devices to roam free.

How now?

The echoBox works by sending the Ethernet signal across the coax network and its parent company, Asheridge Communications, reckons it will deliver up to 200Mbps to 16 rooms around the home.

That equates to being able to download a two hour film or 1000 MP3s in six minutes flat – or stream a film without any delay and rid yourself of the teeth-gnashing frustration of latency when gaming online.

"This technology has been used in America for some time with approximately 80 per cent of homes utilising a similar system for the delivery of cable TV," Jason Dando, business development danager at Asheridge, commented.

"The existing coax network in the home provides a shielded (protected from interference) pathway for Ethernet; our Echobox allows families to extract the most from the connection in their home without the frustrations currently being experienced 99 per cent of Wi-Fi users."

It may be cheaper and less hassle than rewiring your home, but the Echobox itself doesn't come cheap at around £64 per box (plus P&P) – you'll need a separate box for every port you want to ethernetify, although Asheridge is offering discounts if you buy in bulk.

Update: Asheridge has addressed some points raised by commenters. Jason Dando, business development manager, offers the following responses:

"In response to eddycarr, the echoBox is an alternative to a homeplug/powerline adapter and a recent test report on the echoBox has resultedin a best average network speed of 136Mbps. The shielding on the cable means that the strength will not be affected by interference from other electronic devices in the home; this gives you a constant feed that won't drop in-and-out like Wi-Fi.

"tentimes is correct, the echoBox needs an aerial point in each room that you want an Ethernet connection. I would say, however, that multiple aerial points are becoming increasingly common in homes and even if you have one or two, the echoBox is more affordable than re-wiring the home with fibre as the Coax/aerial network is already in place."