Internet users who illegally download copyrighted material could soon find themselves listed on a national database of offenders, if record label bosses in the UK have their way.

The BPI, which represents the major labels on UK shores, wants ISPs like Virgin, Sky and BT to sign-up for a voluntary scheme to keep track of those pirating music, movies and TV shows on their networks.

If the plans are ever put into action, the list could be used to prosecute or disconnect those suspected of downloading from file-sharing sites.

The proposals will be one of the topics on the table at Downing Street on September 12, when the record labels will discuss anti-privacy measures with prime minister David Cameron.

Sticky issue

The database plan could revive the three strikes system proposed under the controversial Digital Economy Act reforms passed in 2011, but not yet written into law.

Under the new plan, repeat offenders would receive letters from their ISP warning them against downloading pirate material, before speed throttling, disconnection or legal prosecution.

ISPs appear willing to explore anti-piracy initiatives, but there are concerns that creating a database would contravene the data protection laws

Virgin Media spokesperson Emma Hutchinson said: "Music and film companies are speaking to broadband providers about how to address illegal file-sharing but what they're currently proposing is unworkable."

Via The Guardian