The convenience of being able to surf the web on the sofa in your pants has made Wi-Fi a popular technology for many, but interference, speed and security issues have lessened its appeal among Ethernet cable die-hards.

China-based tech giant Huawei is looking to tick off at least one of those limitations (potentially coaxing said die-hards to the couch in the process) with a new 'ultra fast-WiFi' standard called 802.11ax. And how fast is 'ultra fast'? Try 10Gbps for size.

The company, which is currently trialling the technology at its campus in Shenzhen, claims to have achieved a record transmission data rate of 10.53Gbps on 5GHz frequently band.

That's a tenfold increase in efficiency over today's still-pretty-fast 802.11ac standard.

In a company blog post, Huawei writes that the faster speeds will be necessary to provide a more reliable Wi-Fi service in public places - such as enterprise offices, airports, stadiums, shopping centers and coffee shops.

Worth the wait?

Of course, you'd have to be one of the lucky ones to take advantage of such high speeds at home at the moment.

Google (with its Fiber-to-the-Home service) and only a handful of other ISPs are offering 1Gbps connections in the US, as are Hyperoptic and Gigaclear in the UK (incumbent BT is currently conducting trials).

It may be just as well that faster speeds aren't readily available, as Huawei reckons the new standard won't be approved until 2018, meaning your current router likely has a few more years left in it yet.