How businesses need to manage the evolution of the internet

What's in store for 2015 and beyond?

The evolution of the Internet

As we approach the half way mark of 2014, how we manage new internet technologies in the business and consumer realms continues to crop up in tech commentary on a regular basis.

Driving much of the discussion this year has been the internet of things (IOT) and how this is about to change our home and working lives. With these impending changes in mind, we spoke to Paul Heywood, EMEA director of internet infrastructure specialist Dyn, about the challenges of IOT and much more.

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TechRadar Pro: How can businesses leverage internet performance to overcome the complexity of latency issues?

Paul Heywood: The key to Internet performance is understanding your end-user demographics and moving the content closer to them.

By doing that, you shorten the distance between your end users and your content, vastly lowering the latency an end-user experiences reaching your brand. Internet performance is about understanding the interactions of the entire technology stack, rather than looking at components in isolation.

Spreading out your content so it is closer to your end users also allows you to more easily isolate issues, divert traffic to other sites as needed, or bring on extra capacity to meet high demand times. Studies have shown that for every one-second increase in latency, there is a 7% drop in online sales.

TRP: How can Internet enabled technology enable organisations to achieve rapid globalisation?

PH: A beautiful self-service user experience for a product or service is not only key to user delight (just look at Uber), it is also the most scalable and efficient way to service customers 24/7 around the globe.

Technologies such as cloud hosting, mobile devices, broadband, and content delivery networks have allowed organisations to be everywhere, for everyone, at all times.

What's more, the drive for greater efficiency in the delivery and support of technology has made this more cost effective than ever before.

TRP: What will enterprise IT of the future look like and how can IT teams best manage the opportunity to innovate?

PH: Agility and innovation is the name of the game; not only to move quickly, but to learn to quickly and effectively change direction as needed in response to customers.

Month long IT endeavours often become obsolete by the time they are ready for deployment. Shorter operational windows can leave everyone frustrated, both outside and inside IT.

IT won't be a separate functional silo of the organisation anymore; technology experts will be locked arm-in-arm with business experts and embedded throughout the functional groups, just like developers and operators have demonstrated in the cultural and professional movement that is "DevOps," which is credited for the massive scale and agility of the web giants.

Technology is now a revenue-generating asset not merely an operational cost. Our advice to IT professionals is simple: understand how your organisation makes money and work towards adding value.

TRP: How can transactional email be deployed to leverage the internet of things?

PH: We've mentioned in some articles before (like this one) that one of the main reasons that email has been so successful throughout the years is that it was built on a platform independent framework, unlike other messaging types like social platforms.

This means that an email is originated by a sender that usually belongs to a mailbox provider or business. But let's just say that today these senders belong to a domain.

The email travels from the originating server at that domain to the destination domain's receiving server, and is then made available for the end recipient as part of that domain. It's all about the domain and the mail server originating and receiving mail on behalf of all the recipients under that domain.