There's a new man at Number 10 Downing Street. His name is David Cameron. He is promising to make lots of changes to how the UK is run. One of which might well see the controversial Digital Economy Act scrapped.

And whether or not you are dyed-in-the-wool red or blue, if you like technology and you use the internet you are likely to be aware that the Digital Economy Act is a bit of a mess. To put it lightly.

In particular, Lord Mandelson's proposals for a 'three strikes' style measure to deal with persistent illegal filesharers drew a considerable amount of criticism from liberal commentators.

A Parliamentary 'stitch up'

The bill was passed through the Commons during the 'wash-up' period before the General Election - which in itself led a number of commentators to criticise the process in which it was seemingly rushed through Parliament without due consideration and debate.

The new Deputy Prime Minister and leader of the Liberal Democrats, Nick Clegg, said at the time that the passing of the Digital Economy Act was a "stitch-up" between Labour and Conservative MPs and a "classic example of what's wrong with Westminster".

Clegg now has the necessary clout to make some changes and, ideally, repeal the entire Act.

The new government ('ConDem'?) is reportedly looking to scrap plans for ID cards and biometric passports, with speculation mounting that the Digital Economy Act could also be in for the chop.

Via PC Pro