Amazon, Google, Facebook and more denounce proposed net neutrality rules

And the commission turns against itself

A large group of internet companies, led by some of the biggest names in the business, have taken a stand against new net neutrality rules put forth by FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler.

Amazon, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Netflix, Twitter and Yahoo are just some of the cosigners on a short yet sharp letter (PDF) to the FCC.

"According to recent news reports," the letter states, "the Commission intends to propose rules that would enable phone and cable internet service providers to discriminate both technically and financially against internet companies and to impose new tolls on them. If these reports are correct, this represents a grave threat to the internet."

The companies note that instead of "permitting bargaining and discrimination," the FCC's edicts "should protect users and internet companies ... against blocking, discrimination and paid prioritization, and should make the market for internet services more transparent."

Will the commission listen?

The internet companies' furor comes amidst public outcry against proposed rules that would open internet "fast lanes" for firms willing to pay. Those who aren't would invariably be stuck in internet slow lanes.

While FCC Chairman Wheeler has maintained he's on the side of an equal and open internet, even fellow Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel said there are "real concerns" with his net neutrality proposals and wants to delay the commission's "consideration" of them by at least a month.

The rules are set for a vote May 15, and a Sunshine Period by which the FCC can accept public comment ends tomorrow.

Due to the "torrent of public response" the proposed rules have elicited, Rosenworcel states more time is needed to collect and consider public input.

As of this writing, the FCC's vote is still scheduled for May 15.

Via Engadget

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

News Editor (US)

As the US News Editor, Michelle (Twitter, Google+) keeps her eye on all things tech with particular interest on phones, tablets and finding out who the people are behind the devices. Any phone that can survive a regular (accidental) drop has her vote for best handset. Michelle previously worked covering local news in the Bay Area and has been with TechRadar since July 2012.