PlayStation Suite SDK gives devs pass to the PS Vita party

Code opened up for PC users

Sony has opened the PlayStation Suite for developers who wish to port their games on to the PS Vita.

At the moment it is an open beta, and just for those who code on a PC, but devs can essentially use the software development kit to spec out their games on the PS Vita format and test them to make sure they are working properly on the console.

Once the open beta has ended then the games can be offered to PS Vita users through the PlayStation Store.

"You can develop games and applications that utilise physical buttons and touchscreen by using the integrated development environment (IDE) and simulator for the PC which are both included in the PlayStation Suite SDK," explains Sony's site.

"In the Developers Forum, you can discuss issues and exchange information with developers throughout the world. Of course, you can also interact with SCE employees, who will participate in discussions and offer development support."

Putting a price on it

Sony will hope that devs latch on to the PS Vita and start producing decent, low-cost games for the device.

Given that it has both touch and physical controls, there does seem to be a lot of scope for games producers to get their games on board the system.

The PS Vita had its worst week of sales ever last week in Japan, so Sony will be hoping it finds itself with a success ported on to the Vita.

One caveat with the PS Suite SDK is that a game must be paid-for, or at least use the freemium method – there's an in-app purchasing system to follow, according to Sony.

The full PlayStation Suite Developer Program will be released in late 2012, so there's a few months leeway there for developers to hone their skills before the games go live.

Via SlashGear

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