You have to hand it to Nintendo. Few video game conglomerates would have the guts to pull off a stunt like this week's Direct presentation, which showcased Nintendo's bizarro Animal Crossing-Sims hybrid, Tomodachi Life.

Tomodachi Life is a life simulator in which you create your ultimate fantasy population, based on your Miis and their individual personality traits, to inhabit an island.

"A pop star might fall in love with your lookalike. Your mum might jump on stage to belt out heavy metal songs. Or you could become famous striking poses down the runway of a fashion show wearing cute and silly outfits," explains Nintendo.

But you know what? This isn't really the sort of game you can "explain". So it's probably better for you to just watch the video below and come to your own conclusions.

The thing is, laugh as we did at super-buff Reggie, Iwata's dinosaur suit and, well, to be honest quite a lot of other stuff, the potential for Tomodachi to replicate its success in the West didn't escape us.

The game been massive in Japan with the series shifting almost 6 million units to date. And we're starting to understand why.

After all, in what other game could you see Morgan Freeman sing with Russell Brand, the Undertaker, Rapunzal from Tangled and CVG's Chris Scullion?

Bring on June. Our bodies are ready.

Hotline Miami
Tomodachi Life, is that you? Oh wait, we've moved on

Take the call

Dennaton Games is back for another round of blood-smeared, neon-charged family fun. Hotline Miami 2: Wrong Number isn't out until later in the year but this week we were treated to the first trailer for the game, and it's looking mighty, mighty fine.

Key learnings: dual-wielding is going to make us feel totally badass; chainsaws are going to be a little bit messy.

It's time to strap on those weird animal masks again, and cross those bloody fingers that we're in for another awesome soundtrack. You'll get your hands on Wrong Number in Q3 this year but until then you can just keep hitting the replay button below.

Mauled

There have been few travesties in the gaming industry as devastating as the death of Lucasarts. From Dark Forces II to The Secret of Monkey Island to Rogue Squadron, the studio was responsible for some of our favourite memories - and you got the impression it also had so much more to give.

We still shed a tear any time someone mentions Star Wars 1313.

This week we learned that a long time ago, Lucasarts was also working on a third-person action game centred around Darth Maul that looked a little bit awesome.

According to insiders speaking to GameInformer, LucasArts and Red Fly Studios were working on the game together before it got tossed to the Sarlacc.

You see, apparently George Lucas suggested the idea that Darth Maul and Darth Talon team up for a "buddy cop-like experience" and the whole thing kind of fell apart some time after that.

Now close your eyes and imagine what that game could have looked like. Getting a good picture there?

Yeah, you guys were lucky to get Jar Jar.

To sign off this week, here's the latest episode of Gaming Spotlight in which we ask, Nintendo: doomed or just dormant? Hands on buzzers, please.

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